Friday, November 13, 2009

Junkyard Broad-Bound?

Posted By on Fri, Nov 13, 2009 at 8:30 AM

The Junkyard Museum isn’t even built yet and it’s already got people saying they should have another kid.

Or a kid.

Though the Junkyard is located temporarily at the old Marine Hospital near the National Ornamental Metal Museum, founder Lisa Williamson would like the art museum’s permanent home to be on Broad Avenue.

“I’ve been looking at Broad Avenue for a long time,” she said at a meeting of the Historic Broad Avenue Business Association last night. “If it were just up to me, I’d put it here in a second. Everybody’s rallied around me … I already feel at home here.”

The Junkyard will be an interactive art museum using found objects and architectural salvage to create climbable sculptures. Though many childrens museums try to prepare kids for adulthood, the Junkyard — and museums like it, such as the City Museum in St. Louis — would encourage teenagers and adults to be kids again.

Williamson and the Junkyard board are in talks to lease the warehouse on which the iconic Broad Avenue watertower rests, but they’re also open to other spaces in the neighborhood.

Lined with galleries and home to UrbanArt, Broad is the city’s newest arts district.

John Weeden, UrbanArt’s executive director, thinks locating the Junkyard there would be brilliant.

“It could provide an anchor for this area … as well as offer incredible opportunities to local artists,” he said.

The location is also in the middle of a neighborhood and would be within walking distance of four schools.

Broad Avenue residents and business owners seemed to feel the museum would be a good fit with the neighborhood. Most of the questions during the Q&A portion of the presentation focused on possible suggestions for fundraising and ways to make the Broad location a reality.

“We heard Lisa was looking over here and we jumped at it,” said Pat Brown of the T. Clifton Art Gallery. “This is just what we need.”

Brown said the Junkyard could be a magnet for bringing new people to the neighborhood: “This would redefine people’s perceptions of Broad.”

Comments (2)

Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

 
Subscribe to this thread:
Showing 1-2 of 2

Add a comment

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Flyer Flashback

Looking Back at the “Best Of Memphis” List That Started It All

Tidbits from the 1994 "Best of Memphis" list.

Read Story

© 1996-2014

Contemporary Media
460 Tennessee Street, 2nd Floor | Memphis, TN 38103
Visit our other sites: Memphis Magazine | Memphis Parent | Memphis Business Quarterly
Powered by Foundation