Thursday, November 13, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Young Dolph’s “I Need My Medicine”

Posted By on Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 5:55 PM

  • dolphworld.jpg
Back in 2010, a close friend put me on Young Dolph's Welcome to Dolph World mixtape. After listening to it a couple times, I was convinced that Dolph had the potential to catapult Memphis' underground rap scene to new heights.

Although Dolph's subject matter on the project wasn't dramatically different from other Memphis rappers, it was refreshing to hear his smooth but clever flow. 

One of my favorite tracks off Welcome to Dolph World is the DJ Squeeky-produced "I Need My Medicine." Stream it below. 

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter and friend me on Facebook

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

PreauXX Drops “Don't Play" Freestyle

Posted By on Tue, Nov 11, 2014 at 3:24 PM

preauxx.jpg

To hold fans over until his Forever. I Will album drops, PreauXX has decided to deliver new freestyles every Tuesday. For the first installment of "2XX's Tuesdays," he spits a few bars over the instrumental to Travis Scott’s “Don't Play.” Stream the freestyle below.
Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter and friend me on Facebook

Tags: , , , , ,

Saturday, November 8, 2014

Jeezy Talks "Seen It All" Album, Tour

Posted By on Sat, Nov 8, 2014 at 5:40 PM

13TH WITNESS
  • 13th Witness

“Me and Goldmouth in his jeep, we on the road/All I seen was red and blue lights, I thought he told/ Butterflies as we going through this roadblock/Ask yourself questions like, ‘Is this where my road stops?’”

On the track “How I Did It (Perfection)” off his latest album, Seen It All: The Autobiography, Jeezy reflects on a highway drug run that almost earned him football numbers in prison. This is just one of many life stories the Platinum-selling artist shares on his seventh solo album.

Jeezy is currently embarked on a two-month, 35-city "Seen It All" tour to promote the project. And Memphis is among the cities he’s making a stop in. On Wednesday, November 12th, the Snowman will perform Seen It All live at Minglewood Hall.

Jeezy took time out to talk about his latest album and tour, Bishop T.D. Jakes’ issue with his “Holy Ghost (remix),” growing both musically and as a man, and why he prefers Avión over other brands of tequila.

Follow Jeezy on Twitter and Instgram
For tickets to his show at Minglewood, click here

You’ve been on tour for almost a month now. How has everything been so far?

It’s crazy, man. It’s real personable and it’s real intimate. It’s an experience more so than a concert or a show. Just telling the story and watching the way records relate to different individuals. It’s almost like being in a small church, honestly.

Would you say this tour is more monumental than previous ones you’ve embarked on?

It’s more for them. You know, when I get on stage, I tell them, ‘This is y’all night. Whatever y’all want me to do up here, I’m going to do it and some more.’ But it’s more so, like, it’s really having a good time. It’s almost like being a pastor at one of those churches that holds 10,000, and then you just say, ‘You know what, I’m going to go back to my roots. I’m going to go to the local neighborhood churches, and I’m going to talk to the people and give them the same Sunday but better.’ I’ve been on tour with Jay-Z. I’ve been on tour with [Lil] Wayne, with Wiz Khalifa. I’ve been on great tours, but at the same time, it’s like this is touching people.

Prior to undertaking your latest journey, you co-headlined Wiz Khalifa’s “Under the Influence of Music” tour. How was that experience?

It was a great tour. This one is personal, but that was a real tour. That was probably one of the best tours I’ve been on. There were a lot of different types of people that I had never heard and seen live. It’s crazy because almost every night I got a standing ovation.

I would like to congratulate you on Seen It All. I thought it was one of the best projects I’ve heard from you. Explain how you think this project differs from your previous efforts.

What I did differently, I was just more honest, more personable about it, and more straightforward about how I felt. And the G’s, we don’t really get into that. We heard Jay-Z write, ‘I can’t see it coming down my eyes, so I gotta make the song cry.’ It was his way of saying, ‘I know that I could never do it, but if this song feels that way to you, then go ahead.’ With me, when I say, ‘Seen it all,’ that’s what I seen — the good, the bad, and the ugly. And I still stood the test of time, but when you get into records like “Holy Ghost” and “No Tears," those are really records that are real sincere. And I don’t think I would sit down and have that conversation with anybody, but through my music I can tell that story. But at the same time, I never made songs that was that vulnerable or honest like that. With Seen It All, I was real honest about everything. Even with the title track, I never really talked about exactly how I did it and how I pulled up at Magic City and what my view was like. At the same time, you take records like “1/4 Block,” that’s how I really felt my first day when I got on the block and I was hustling. I felt like I couldn’t be stopped. Those are real records. They weren’t made for the radio. They weren’t made for the clubs, necessarily. They were made for this tour because I wanted to go out and perform the record to people who really understand and know what it means to struggle and to hustle and to go through adversity.

  

So you actually created this album with the tour in mind?

Yep. I start it from the top, and I go all the way through it. That’s what I wanted. I didn’t do it for the radio and the clubs. I’ve done that so much, it’s like … you hear so many things on the radio and in the clubs, it’s not a place for real message music. And it’s just like, I’ve got radio hits, I’ve got club smashes, and it’s like, ‘You know what, let me take it back to the basics and go in these venues where I know these people really love me in and love this. And I’m going to do these records, and they’re going to sing along.’ They sing all the records word-for-word.

If nothing else, what do you hope listeners take away from the album?

I just hope they understand what it really means when somebody says, ‘I've seen it ll.’ It’s someone out there that’s seen the world, but when it comes to what we do and how we live, I think I’ve seen more than the average cat. I just hope they walk away with some type of gems, some type of jewels, understanding that, ‘Okay, when you get in situations in life, you can put this on and listen to it.’ I listen to Makaveli all the time. I listen to All Eyez on Me all the time because [2Pac is] pretty much the only person that understands where I came from. And he was ahead of his time when he was making those records. And I was just riding around listening to them. It was just cool, and I loved them because it sounded good. But now, I find myself picking up jewels and hymns out of his words, like, every other day. It’s like, ‘Damn, I just went through that. That just happened to me.’ So he was going through those things way before I was, but he was putting them in music form. So I hope that people can take what I'm saying and put them in music form, because it’s a different type of game out there now, a different type of hustle, and it’s a different type of world from when we came up, but the same rules always apply. That love and loyalty and that honor code, that G code. It don’t really apply because ain’t nobody really stressing it in their music and in their lifestyle.

You linked back up with Jay-Z on this project. Is it intimidating to go toe-to-toe on a song with one of the best to do it?

With me and Jay, it’s always been good. But I’ll tell you this, though, I feel like I’ve scrimmaged with him enough to be ready for that. Me and Jay got more songs than him and B.I.G. got. We’ve burned so many records and [rhymed] back-and-forth so many times, I feel like when it came around this time, I was ready for it. But it was perfect, though. We just performed it for the first time together in the Barclays for [Power 105.1's Powerhouse 2014]. And to see that response, in front of 20,000, it was unreal. It was worth every minute of writing the record and waiting to perform it. 



Bishop T.D. Jakes recently expressed his disapproval of you placing an excerpt of a sermon he presented at the beginning of your “Holy Ghost” remix. What are your thoughts on the situation?

In all actuality, it wasn’t meant for that version of the record to come out, but I was actually incarcerated at the time, so I think it was a mistake on my engineer’s and my team’s part but nothing that was blatant. But I understand his position, so I wasn’t really tripping on it. I spoke to [Minister Louis] Farrakhan about it, and we both agreed that it is what it is. And we kind of let it go, but at the same time I can see him trying to separate hisself from what I do. But at the same time, it is what it is. I always say, ‘Give glory to God.’ And I really wanted him to know that his words reach people in all walks of life, too. And I really wanted them to hear that speech, because when I heard it, it touched me.

Let's Get It: Thug Motivation 101 served as your official introduction to the world. From that album up to this point, how would you say you’ve changed as an artist and as a person?

Thug Motivation, I feel like I’ve got that under my belt, so I would never try to recreate my first album, but I just think that’s a big platform to stand on. So with everything I do now, I just try to keep my message going. And I think now, I’m a lot wiser, I’m a lot smarter, I’m definitely a lot more calculated, and I’m evolving. If anything, I just feel like I’m evolving. When you think about B.I.G. and Pac, they weren’t in the position that they were five albums in and 10 years into the game, and they had to figure the dos and don’ts from a whole other perspective, because you’ve got to keep going with the times. I’m riding those waves and those currents and figuring it out as I go, and I just think that’s new. The only other person I ever saw do that was Jay. People don’t last 10 to 12 years in this game. It’s just like being on your shit and making sure you’re staying true to yourself and to the people that ride with you. But a lot of the people that was listening to me when Thug Motivation was out, they’re grown now, so they don’t wanna hear no ignorant shit. You gotta come with something with some sense.

In a recent interview, T.I. talked about you guys doing a joint-album titled Dope Boy Academy. What’s the current status of the project?

Right now, we’re just in conversation about it. We haven’t went farther than that. It’s just been some conversation back and forth, but we’re just going to see where that goes.

You’re the multicultural advisor for Avión tequila? How did that come about?

I’m sipping some right now. I’m at my favorite restaurant Spondivits sipping some right now. I’m a big tequila drinker. Right now, I’m drinking a margarita. That’s my favorite drink. But what it was, I was drinking Don Julio 1942, and one of my partners put me on Avión. And when I went over to Avión, I just talked to them about making my own version of 1942, and they were with it. And it just kind of started from there. And I really switched over brands. Instead of me drinking Don Julio, I just started drinking Avión tequila. And it went on to be a business venture. I met the owner, and we became friends. It just made sense for who I am, because that’s what I drink. Anybody [who] knows me, knows that I’m shots or some margaritas. Plus it’s good. It’s better than a lot of the other tequila brands that I’ve tasted.

What’s next for Jeezy?

I’m going to finish up this tour, and I’m going to get ready to hit these folks again. I’m ready for it.

A new album?

A new everything. A whole new look and everything. I’m ready.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter and friend me on Facebook

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, November 6, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Willie Hutch's "Kelly Green"

Posted By on Thu, Nov 6, 2014 at 1:43 PM

willie_hutch.jpg

Legendary singer, songwriter, and musician Willie Hutch created music decades ago that continues to influence musicians today.

Hutch has to be the most sampled artist by Three 6 Mafia producers D.J. Paul and Juicy J — think records like "Stay Fly," "Poppin' My Collar," and "I Choose You."

Similar to Marvin Gaye, Hutch possessed a distinctly soulful sound that reigned supreme on Motown Records during its heyday. He's also largely known for creating the soundtracks for Blaxploitation films The Mack and Foxy Brown.

One of my favorite songs by Hutch is titled "Kelly Green." The song appears on his Midnight Dancer album. Check it out below.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter and friend me on Facebook

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Rick Ross Recruits Memphis A-list for "Elvis Presley Blvd. (Remix)"

Posted By on Tue, Nov 4, 2014 at 4:42 PM

rick_ross_elvis_presley_blvd.jpg

Rick Ross enlisted the help of a few notable Memphis rap artists for the remix to his track "Elvis Presley Blvd."

The Miami representative, who was recently vocal about his love for Memphis, recruited Yo Gotti, MJG, Project Pat, Juicy J, and Young Dolph for the seven-minute recreation.

Ross' forthcoming album, Hood Billionaire, is slated to drop November 24th.

Stream "Elvis Presley Blvd. (Remix)" below.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter and Facebook

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Frayser Boy, Lil Wyte Perform at Not No Moe Album Release Party

Posted By on Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 5:01 PM

frayser1.png

Academy Award-winning rapper Frayser Boy held an album release party for his latest project, Not No Moe, at the Purple Haze nightclub Wednesday night.

A few of the city’s notable rap artists came out to show support, including DJ Zirk (who actually hopped on the turntables for a second), Lil Wyte, Miscellaneous, Jason Da Hater, and Snootie Wild. Dennis Graham, the father of hip-hop star Drake, was even in the building.

After mingling with friends and supporters, Frayser hopped on stage to perform a couple cuts off Not No Moe. And fellow Bay Area representative Lil Wyte grabbed the mic to perform “Oxy Cotton” from his 2003 debut, Doubt Me Now.

Check out some brief footage I captured on my phone of the performances below.


Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter and friend me on Facebook

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Throwback Thursday: DJ Zirk's "Lock 'Em N Da Trunk"

Posted By on Thu, Oct 30, 2014 at 11:19 AM

Screen_Shot_2014-10-30_at_11.05.57_AM.png

Hailing from Orange Mound, one of Memphis' most historic and culturally rich communities, DJ Zirk took the city by storm when he dropped the bass-ridden track “Lock ’Em N Da Trunk.”

Although it was released to the masses nearly two decades ago, the Memphis classic continues to get played in whips, nightclubs, and at Jookin’ events.

Zirk recently collaborated with former rivals Three 6 Mafia Da Mafia 6ix to create "Lock’m N Da Trunk V.2." The alternate version is on Da Mafia 6ix’s new Hear Sum Evil mixtape.

Peep Zirk’s original version of “Lock ’Em N Da Trunk” below.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter and friend me on Facebook

Tags: , , , , , ,

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Yo Gotti Connects with Lil Boosie for "I Feel Like"

Posted By on Wed, Oct 29, 2014 at 2:28 PM

Screen_Shot_2014-10-29_at_2.12.30_PM.png

Yo Gotti continues to dish out new music to keep fans satisfied until his The Art of Hustle album drops.

In August, he released the project's debut single "Errrbody," and dropped a remix to the smash earlier this month, which features fellow Southern spitters Lil Wayne and Ludacris.

Now Gotti's connected with Louisiana lyricist Lil Boosie for his latest banger "I Feel Like." The track is also slated to appear on The Art of Hustle, which Gotti said would drop later this year or first quarter of 2015 in a recent XXL interview.

Check out the visual to “I Feel Like” below.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter and friend me on Facebook

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Virghost Releases Visual to "Crazy"

Posted By on Tue, Oct 28, 2014 at 3:15 PM

Screen_Shot_2014-10-28_at_2.36.10_PM.png

More than a month after releasing his concept album GHOSTS, Virghost drops a visual to the project’s track "Crazy."

On the song, the up-and-coming hip-hop artist vents about the stress and frustration he experienced while living under the roof of a strict and religious father.

"Crazy" is one of many tracks off GHOSTS Virghost uses to address matters that haunted him in the past, which ultimately birthed his music career.

Last month, Virghost decoded GHOSTS track-by-track. His thoughts can be read here. Peep the visual to “Crazy” below.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter and friend me on Facebook

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Lil Daniel and Dr. Rico vs. G-Nerd and Lil Black

Posted By on Thu, Oct 23, 2014 at 2:44 PM

Screen_Shot_2014-10-23_at_1.45.57_PM.png

Since its emergence in the late '80s, Gangsta Walking has been a positive way for inner-city youth to express themselves. Now known as Jookin’, the style of dance typically involves a person sliding, chopping, rippling their arms, stomping, tiptoeing, and twisting their body to a rap song.

Over recent years, the dance subgenre has received attention globally. Videos of Jookin’ battles have collectively garnered millions of views on Youtube.

Lil Buck, one of Memphis' most popular Jookers, catapulted the dance style to new heights after touring with Madonna as a back-up dancer, appearing on shows like Ellen DeGeneres and So You Think You Can Dance, and collaborating with acclaimed cellist Yo-Yo Ma.

In addition to Buck, there are numerous Jookers in Memphis that are highly respected. And Lil Daniel, Dr. Rico, G-Nerd, and Lil Black are amid that bunch.

In 2010, Daniel and Rico banded together to battle G-Nerd and Black during a Jookin' competition. Peep both parts of the battle below.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter and friend me on Facebook

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Throwback Thursday: OG Boo Dirty's "Change Gone Come"

Posted By on Thu, Oct 16, 2014 at 5:15 PM

boo_dirty.jpg

Back in March 2012, South Memphis-based spitter OG Boo Dirty dropped his Born a Soldier, Die a Vet mixtape.

The project boasts several tracks worth checking out. However, there is one cut that stands out significantly: “Change Gone Come.” Inspired by Sam Cooke’s heartfelt classic “A Change is Gonna Come,” Boo Dirty opens up about some of his struggles (and accomplishments) on his version of the song. Stream it below.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter: @Lou4President
Friend me on Facebook: Louis Goggans

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Friday, October 10, 2014

Wave Chapelle Hits Ardent Studios for “North Side Blues” Visual

Posted By on Fri, Oct 10, 2014 at 3:21 PM

wave-chapelle-560x250.jpg

Promising rapper Wave Chapelle selected none other than legendary recording facility Ardent Studios as the location to shoot his “North Side Blues” visual.

The song is off the Milwaukee/Memphis representative’s Only the Beginning mixtape, which dropped in late September. The effort serves as his first project under Yo Gotti’s Collective Music Group (CMG) label. Peep the visual to “North Side Blues” below.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter: @Lou4President
Friend me on Facebook: Louis Goggans

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Throwback Thursday: Starlito's “Mental Warfare”

Posted By on Thu, Oct 9, 2014 at 4:12 PM

Screen_Shot_2014-10-09_at_3.41.23_PM.png

Arguably one of rap’s most underrated lyricists, Nashville artist Starlito is heralded for being insightful and honest in his music.

From battling depression, Codeine-dependence and insomnia to enjoying the spoils that come from an extensive underground fanbase and street ties, Lito uses his music to reflect on real-life circumstances. And this is the case with his 2012 mixtape, Mental Warfare.

The project’s title track brings listeners into the mind of an emcee attempting to stay sane while dealing with day-to-day challenges. "Mental Warfare" is produced by DJ Burn One and features a soothing hook from Robin Raynelle. Stream it below.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter: @Lou4President
Friend me on Facebook: Louis Goggans

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Monday, October 6, 2014

New T-shirt Campaign Raises Funds for Cancer Fighters, Survivors

Posted By on Mon, Oct 6, 2014 at 4:01 PM

survived.png

For Breast Cancer Awareness Month, up-and-coming contemporary gospel hip-hop artist Margaret “Butta MD” Deloach has launched a T-shirt campaign entitled “All I know is...I Survived.”

Emblazoned with the words “Disease, Sickness, Addiction, Poverty...I Survived,” the tees are $20. Deloach will donate a portion of the proceeds raised from the campaign to a hand-selected family or patient that has or currently is being affected by cancer.

“I want to give back because I know the struggles, pains, and emotion that a family goes through when a family member has cancer,” Deloach said in a statement.

Deloach’s mom, Gloria, inspired the philanthropic effort. On August 20th, 2014, three days after her 59th birthday, Gloria succumbed to cancer. The disease started in her breast and traveled to her lungs and bones.

The campaign's slogan is derived from the song “I Survived,” which Deloach created during her mom’s battle with cancer. The song appears on her EP, Da NU Norm; We Made It. The first 10 people who place an order will receive a free physical copy of the project.

According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 1,665,540 new cancer cases will be diagnosed this year. And, in 2014, nearly 600,000 people are estimated to die from cancer in the nation. The disease is the second most common cause of death in the U.S., accounting for nearly one of every four deaths.

This is the second campaign Deloach has launched in support of cancer victims. Earlier this year, she introduced her “We Are Warriors; We Made It” campaign, which managed to raise more than $400. A portion of those proceeds were donated to the WINGS Cancer Foundation.

To purchase a shirt, click here. And check out an interview of Deloach talking to me about her debut EP and mom's battle with cancer below.


Check out my website; ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter; @Lou4President
Friend me on Facebook: Louis Goggans

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Friday, October 3, 2014

Rick Ross Talks Love for Memphis, “Elvis Presley Blvd”

Posted By on Fri, Oct 3, 2014 at 5:35 PM

rick-ross-breakfast-club.jpg

Rick Rock seemingly shares a love and respect for Memphis.

The Grammy-nominated, platinum-selling artist has opened multiple Wing Stop restaurants in the city, creating numerous jobs for locals. In August, he was presented a key to Memphis by Mayor A C Wharton for his economic contributions to the community.

In September, the Miami-bred rap sensation delivered his Project Pat-featured song “Elvis Presley Blvd,” paying tribute to the historic strip.

During an interview with The Breakfast Club, Ross talked about his love for Memphis, helping bring more jobs to the city, his respect for Elvis Presley, and more.

Ross begins talking about Memphis at the 15:44 mark of the interview. Check it out below.

Check out my website: ahumblesoul.com
Follow me on Twitter: @Lou4President
Friend me on Facebook: Louis Goggans

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Most Commented On

Top Viewed Stories

ADVERTISEMENT

© 1996-2015

Contemporary Media
460 Tennessee Street, 2nd Floor | Memphis, TN 38103
Visit our other sites: Memphis Magazine | Memphis Parent | Memphis Business Quarterly
Powered by Foundation