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Comment Archives: Stories: Politics

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

CL, I'm afraid that not only has that ship sailed, there is no one left to build a new one.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Nick R on 03/16/2017 at 12:46 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@CL

If you are of a mind, follow Funk's link to what are, in the judgment of the World Economic Forum, the best school systems. Putting aside any concerns you might have about the competence of the World Economic Forum to make this judgment in the first place, can you figure out what these systems have in common?

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by ArlingtonPop on 03/16/2017 at 12:46 PM

Re: “Another Tale of Two Cities: How to Deal With Donald Trump: PART ONE

nobody, You know that even if folks were given access to low cost Canadian psychotropics, it means nothing if they don't use them.

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by Nick R on 03/16/2017 at 12:44 PM

Re: “Another Tale of Two Cities: How to Deal With Donald Trump: PART ONE

Lots of people read it. That doesn't mean it's respected. Lots of people voted for drumpf. Lots of people watch fox news.

Sick burn on the username. You sure put me in my place.

5 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by nobody on 03/16/2017 at 12:38 PM

Re: “Another Tale of Two Cities: How to Deal With Donald Trump: PART ONE

Nobody (well-chosen): the Daily Mail, in addition to being a print tabloid, has a web site "MailOnline" which is the most visited English language newspaper web site in the world, with over 12 million daily visitors, internationally. So much for "little respected," eh?

Now, as for the Cheeto-in-Chief, why, oh why, would the Flyer cover his appearance in Nashville? It's not like the Flyer's readership hangs on that lunatic's every word. Hair Trump is rapidly approaching the Kardashians for irrelevance and tedium, and deserves to be ignored as much as possible. Stop giving this man any credibility, since, for most sentient people (which leaves out most of Nashville---or, for that matter, Tennesseans) he deserves none.

2 likes, 5 dislikes
Posted by moverhill on 03/16/2017 at 12:25 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

Again, if we were to emphasize primary education, pay grade school teachers at a much better rate than say French Literature and Philosophy professors, and employ more of them, it would be an investment that would only take 12 years to see fruition.
Well that and bring back tech schools, sending those that promoted the idea that all children should be channeled towards a college education, to replace the burger flippers.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by CL Mullins on 03/16/2017 at 12:23 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@ Grove,

Absolutely agree.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by ArlingtonPop on 03/16/2017 at 11:24 AM

Re: “Another Tale of Two Cities: How to Deal With Donald Trump: PART ONE

I think only one media outlet called the Ole Miss protest a riot - that was the Daily Mail, a little respected British tabloid.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by nobody on 03/16/2017 at 11:12 AM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@Funk,

Technical support is outsourced to India because it's cheaper labor, not because we don't have people in the US that can do it.

Same with manufacturing jobs. They get outsourced to other countries because of the labor cost.

A better example would be the talent that we often import from other countries for high skilled, technical jobs. I would imagine Silicon Valley imports a good bit of talent. Most major corporations do. That's certainly a problem, and I think we agree that our education system needs to be fixed. We just seem to have different views on how that would work best.

I don't think standardization is the answer. If we really wanted to develop our best talent, we would work to identify it early and then start to stratify our students, letting the brightest work at a much accelerated pace, while letting them work alongside other students that are equal to or better than they are, so that they are challenged.

I see it with my own kids. My oldest is strong at basically everything. She gets pulled out of class for some accelerated learning, but a good bit of her day is wasted working on things that she easily masters quickly. She'll spend the rest of her time bored out of her mind.

My youngest has little interest in the language skills, but he's highly interested in math and how things work.

If you could identify the strengths of those students early and then put them in groups that challenge their strengths, they'd accelerate their learning at a much faster pace.FYI

We'll never do that in the US though, because people would struggle to accept that their child might not be fit for the path they always wanted for them.

@AP,

We may just be using different terms. When I say "political power" with school boards, it's not that they have governmental power, but in larger districts, those board positions do become the type of positions people use to springboard themselves into governmental roles.

My point about smaller districts is that when you have smaller districts, those board positions become less about how they can be used to gain name recognition in the community, and they're more often filled by motivated parents within the community that want to make the best of the district.

Believe me, you still get corruption and in-fighting with smaller district boards. I've seen plenty myself out in Germantown, but by and large the desire of the members is to offer the best possible options to the community.

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by GroveReb84 on 03/16/2017 at 10:59 AM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

I don't have kids. I am fine with my tax dollars going to public education. I am not fine with my tax dollars going to private education, especially when that includes schools that teach children that a book of mythology trumps science.

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by B on 03/16/2017 at 9:24 AM

Re: “Another Tale of Two Cities: How to Deal With Donald Trump: PART ONE

Did you wear your vagina hat?

0 likes, 4 dislikes
Posted by Clyde on 03/16/2017 at 7:06 AM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

APop,
"corruption is not in itself political power" It is a mighty component, especially when you can't simply liquidate opposition.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by CL Mullins on 03/15/2017 at 5:35 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@Grove,

We may have to disagree on the power of school boards. The power to issue contracts is economic power, but not political. Political power at its heart is the ability to use force to require people to do what you want them to do. School boards govern school systems but do not administer them. That is, they are not supposed to be involved in the day-to-day activities of the school system. Their role is not to run the system but to insure the system is run correctly. Meaning in a business like manner and in compliance with applicable laws of the state and the policies of the State Department of Education, from which laws and policies they must insure the systems administration does not deviate.

I certainly agree that having any economic power can lead to corruption. However, corruption is not in itself political power but rather a violation of public trust, which policy making boards can do as well as any other type of elected body.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by ArlingtonPop on 03/15/2017 at 5:07 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

Funk,
Good rant.

Posted by CL Mullins on 03/15/2017 at 5:00 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@FUNK

You seem to be confusing education and economics a lot.

They may be interrelated, but are hardly the same thing.

But for the sake of discussion, how would you propose to change the funding system for public education in Tennessee?

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by ArlingtonPop on 03/15/2017 at 4:37 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@FUNK

Thanks for the link

I was looking for objective educational standards, not opinions.

Do those exist?

Posted by ArlingtonPop on 03/15/2017 at 4:33 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@grove

Ain't nuthin' communist about caring about the children in your community.

Ya'll keep saying there ain't no world standards, but if that's true why is tech support that used to be local through Stream now run out of Mumbai? Why are the cars that used to be made in Detroit now made in Japan? The standards I'm referring to are recognized by world class industries, not set by any government or regulating body.

You keep talking about your precious little communities and their special needs, but "special needs" is a new euphemism for good ol' fashioned retardation. Your communities have literally become educationally retarded.

That's how America stopped being great; settling for mediocrity.

The people have spoken. Make America Great Again. Drain the Swamp. No more small town bureaucracy. Time to go big league. We need a new educational funding system. A yuge one.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by FUNKbrs on 03/15/2017 at 4:16 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@Apop

http://www.businessinsider.com/wef-ranking…

According to these guys (business interests) the USA doesn't even make the list of places to look for world class education. Ouch. They say Japan currently sets the standard of excellence, so we should probably start there. The state level is definitely too small of a pond to have real big fish education.

You don't get big fish in small ponds, axiomatically. We do agree that our children deserve the best, yes? By definition that means not letting Japan one-up us, let alone leave us in their dust.

Today's students are the voters of tomorrow. Nobody has more grass-roots political power than a teacher. It might be power with a fuse attached to it, but teacher's aren't just firecrackers. When an educational system blows up, there's very real damage. Just look at Frayser in the fall-out from Frayser Academy as an example.

It is true that the majority of education funds come from the state level.

"Federal contribution to elementary and secondary education is about 8 percent"
https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/fed/rol…

And if this traditional system of education were producing world class results, America would have made list of countries with the best educational system as ranked by business.

Except it didn't.

Tradition has failed us.

Seems to be happening a lot lately.

However, as Americans, when tradition fails, we innovate. We change with the times.

Maybe it's time we change how we fund education, before the times change us from being the America we remember to an America the world has forgotten.

Posted by FUNKbrs on 03/15/2017 at 3:06 PM

Re: “Another Tale of Two Cities: How to Deal With Donald Trump: PART ONE

I remember the good ole days back in 2008 when two Ole Miss students lit an Obama sign on fire the night of his election, and it was called a riot by the media.

It's amazing to see all the "rioting" that's still going on over Trump's election.

2 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by GroveReb84 on 03/15/2017 at 3:01 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@AP,

The big power that school boards do have (even though it's at the behest of the state) is over contracts. If you've got a school board of 200,000 students, contracts for anything to do with that district are BIG money contracts. If you can get a handful of representatives on that board to make sure that the right people get those contracts, it's a big money making venture for those people.

On the idea of some sort of world education standard, I don't think that exists. If you're talking about state and federal curriculum mandates, that's one thing. I've got no problem with standardized testing. Keep that if the state wants to be able to measure the production of school districts.

However, leave it up to the small districts and the residents in them to determine whether they think the test results are adequate or not.

@FUNK,

If you really think you can approach kids from vastly different backgrounds with a standardized education approach, you haven't been involved much with kids. Kids from poorer backgrounds are often going to have different needs and different base education when they enter a school system. If you try to teach everyone exactly the same way with the exact same things, you under-serve almost everyone.

Again, be careful, because you're starting to sound slightly Communist in some of your thoughts. Yes, we are all created equal, but it's foolish to think that means that we all start with equal circumstances and will therefore have the same needs when it comes to education.

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by GroveReb84 on 03/15/2017 at 2:58 PM

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