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Re: “Wanted: MPD Seeks Public Input on Use of Force

It is both a very poorly designed and non representative survey.

They ask citizens to provide survey responses to questions that have grouped civilian behaviors and reactions to police direction for varying degrees of civilian and police behavior under one response.

It will show little and will be challenged by those for and against any of the responses.

They would have been better off hiring a professional (RTR has no demonstrable survey expertise). If they did hire one, don't use that professional ever again.

I'd be ashamed if my team or a peer used this or attempted to reach any conclusions beyond providing the total number of respondents

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by datGuy on 03/16/2017 at 6:00 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

moverhill,
After nearly 40 years in San Francisco I have to say it was smug people like you who turned it into the Disney mall it is today.

11 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by CL Mullins on 03/16/2017 at 5:37 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

@moverhill

I love it when people come together in a meeting of the minds.

We can agree that you would be miserable if you came to live out here and so would we.

15 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by ArlingtonPop on 03/16/2017 at 5:15 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@Oak

'What is needed is the use of big data, to analyze where humans can profitably spend their time and energy, and design educational systems which identify those humans who have the capacity to do that work, and train them, individually. We now can use census data to figure out what actually is effective, and replicate it. We can now look at each and every graduate, and see what works and what does not. We can tailor training to needed skills, and hone the process, graduate by graduate, until each human being obtains skills appropriate to their predilections.'

Listen to what parents will say about that: YOU ARE COMPARTMENTALIZING AND LABELING MY CHILD! HOW DARE YOU PUT LIMITS ON HIS ABILITY TO LEARN!!!!!!!

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by ArlingtonPop on 03/16/2017 at 5:04 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

Abominable (yet another spot-on moniker): I'm not mentally anguished by your living in a white refugee ghetto, I assure you. In fact, I'm delighted you live far away from me, with your like-minded haters. But, c'mon now: "living in Collierville," is more than a bit of an oxymoron. You must have meant to say Stepford.

2 likes, 18 dislikes
Posted by moverhill on 03/16/2017 at 4:44 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

Grove - glad to hear Carriage Crossing was busy when you were there. It's always dead when I've been but think I've only been there on weekdays (lunch hour runs typically).
I hope it will survive because I think it's really pretty - or as pretty as a mall can be. I kind of hate the outdoor mall design but I see its advantages. And they do a great job with the landscaping.
It just makes me sad to see all the empty storefronts out there. And I really wonder why there hasn't been any more development in that area. It seems like they should have filled in a lot of that space between the mall and Winchester by now. Maybe the landowner is waiting for a great offer.

0 likes, 4 dislikes
Posted by nobody on 03/16/2017 at 4:31 PM

Re: “Against Vouchers for Shelby County

Does Kelsey still live not live in his district?

Posted by datGuy on 03/16/2017 at 4:15 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

Mia: the white-flighters have walls, too, only they call them gated communities. They have walls of other kinds to keep the "undesirables" out too, like redlining, mortgage loan discrimination, restrictive covenants, tracking by race, and the like. But, I'm sure Colliervillians and Germantowners would be more than happy to provide refuge to beleaguered Palestinians, but only on the other side of their walls.

3 likes, 20 dislikes
Posted by moverhill on 03/16/2017 at 2:22 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

I'll add that, as a suburban parent, my time is spent on kids. They get home from school, and I'm shuttling them to choir practice at the school, soccer practice, baseball practice, doing homework, etc.

We rarely have time for entertainment, so bar and restaurant convenience has very little value to me. What's of most value to me is proximity to schools and proximity to the sports leagues and after school activities. On the rare occasion we plan a date night or a night at a Grizzlies game, the 30 minute drive to downtown isn't all that inconvenient.

The good news for me is that I get all of that with a commute that includes only 4 stoplights and takes me less than 10 minutes, so unlike a lot of suburbanites, I don't have to sacrifice commute for community. I get both.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by GroveReb84 on 03/16/2017 at 2:06 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

BP45, interesting thoughts. The lack of a city plan allows those miserably designed buildings to proliferate. Its shameful there is no design requirements in south main area and a commission with either the skills or brass to just say no to the worst examples being built.


Grrrr

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by datGuy on 03/16/2017 at 2:01 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

The only way to reimagine education, is to rethink the de facto trajectory which Americans can expect out of our lives in the brave new world of the 21st Century. We need to begin to create what we, as a nation and as a people, want out of our communal existence, in our schools, in our cities, and within the larger world.

If we limit our thinking to the scholastic regimentation of the 20th Century, which was informed by assembly line ideals of mass production and uniformity, we will fail. Completely and utterly. What we HAVE GOTTEN will continue to be what we WILL GET. To use the language of mass production, because of the huge variability of humans which we input into the machine of education, only a select few will be able to be output as doctoral product. That huge 'wastage' is simply too archaic a conceptuality to any longer have any purchase in the modern psyche. We need to reject it.

What is needed is the use of big data, to analyze where humans can profitably spend their time and energy, and design educational systems which identify those humans who have the capacity to do that work, and train them, individually. We now can use census data to figure out what actually is effective, and replicate it. We can now look at each and every graduate, and see what works and what does not. We can tailor training to needed skills, and hone the process, graduate by graduate, until each human being obtains skills appropriate to their predilections.

I am not sure how well we are served by thinking of an educational system with a tier structure and hierarchical 'degree' constructions, anyway. Maybe we should think about smaller chunks of competencies, and let people accumulate those, to assemble a skill tree like Lego blocks, in order to function in a specific role in our economy. There are only so many places that a doctoral degree is even needed, after all. Why are we pointing everybody at that? It's crazy.

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by OakTree on 03/16/2017 at 1:58 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

@nobody,

I thought the same about Carriage Crossing, until I went there last Friday night. I had to drive around a couple times to find a good parking spot. It was packed.

Even the Barnes & Noble was bustling with people, which shocked me considering that it was dealing with the double whammy of being a paper book store AND being in a shopping mall, both of which are supposed to be dying.

It was NOT what I expected at all. I still have my doubts about that set up long-term, but it seemed to be doing very well when I went over the weekend.

On the larger subject, I'll be curious to watch this trend over the next 15 years or so. The traditional move for people has been to live in downtown areas where the action is, until they have children. Then, all of a sudden they want neighborhoods where their kids can ride bikes in the street and where they can install a basketball goal and shoot in the driveway.

Part of me wonders if the shift to urban development is driven by a larger trend, or if it's just generational. The Millennial generation is a very large generation, and it's a generation that's going to wait later to have children than previous generations. Most of that generation is still in the phase where they would naturally still be living near the action, within the cities.

Therefore, I'm curious if the growth in urban development is simply the result of a really large generation of people that hasn't reached its "suburban phase" yet, or if it's actually the result of a larger trend in changing the way people want to live. We'll know for sure in about 10-15 years.

9 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by GroveReb84 on 03/16/2017 at 1:57 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

It gives me great joy to know that just by living in Collierville I can cause mental anguish to people like Moverhill. Sure, I may pay more to have my robes and pointy hat cleaned but it's worth it in the end!

15 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by TheAbominableDavid on 03/16/2017 at 1:51 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

@BP45

How dare those white kids move to the city for a higher quality of life.

Race traitors, amirite?

2 likes, 3 dislikes
Posted by FUNKbrs on 03/16/2017 at 1:38 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

"Dad, are we there yet?"
"No son. You can't get there from here."

12 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by OakTree on 03/16/2017 at 1:31 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

moverhill, and those horrid white people attained those percentages without walling them out vis-a-vis the West Bank and Gaza.

4 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Mia S Kite on 03/16/2017 at 1:23 PM

Re: “The Death of Suburbia

We're still building suburbs in Memphis - we're doing it Downtown. Just look no further than the cheap suburban style units being built in South Main. They are being built for suburbanites who view cities not as a refuge or a place to learn and explore other peoples and cultures. The new Memphis urban pioneers see cities as entertainment complexes. Bars and restaurants, sports arenas and a general dumbing down. Just add the suburban uniform of boat shoes and khakis then stir.

7 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by BP45 on 03/16/2017 at 12:52 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

CL, I'm afraid that not only has that ship sailed, there is no one left to build a new one.

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by Nick R on 03/16/2017 at 12:46 PM

Re: “John DeBerry: An Outlier on Vouchers

@CL

If you are of a mind, follow Funk's link to what are, in the judgment of the World Economic Forum, the best school systems. Putting aside any concerns you might have about the competence of the World Economic Forum to make this judgment in the first place, can you figure out what these systems have in common?

1 like, 0 dislikes
Posted by ArlingtonPop on 03/16/2017 at 12:46 PM

Re: “Another Tale of Two Cities: How to Deal With Donald Trump: PART ONE

nobody, You know that even if folks were given access to low cost Canadian psychotropics, it means nothing if they don't use them.

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by Nick R on 03/16/2017 at 12:44 PM

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