Justice Moses 
Member since Jun 23, 2014

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Re: “Attorney General Eric Holder Addresses Racial Profiling by Law Enforcement

Despite the city of Memphis having many large venues, Attorney General Eric Holder's public forum/roundtable was held in Midtown at the newly built Hatiloo Theater. This small setting was used to promote the place and not a public forum. Upon influx, I was greeted by a host of educators, elected officials, and elite members of the Memphis community. I didn’t see many common Memphians inside the building but near the back there was a nice size roundtable with an active open discussion.

I heard countless ideas promoting genuine philosophies to curb youth violence. One gentleman began to overshadow the moderator by explaining how the city had destroyed the Parks department. The dialogue elaborated to entail why youth resort to violence in Memphis. This former director of parks department made valid points such as “they don’t have anything to do that’s why it so much crime." A lady concurred and stated, “The youth use to stay with us until their parents got home, so they were not in the streets, but the city closed all the gyms.” It was sad to know that these former leaders and members of past administrations had the right concepts in moving the city forward, but I could not help but wonder why the Mayor and the Attorney General were not there listening at this roundtable. I guess they were on their way.

I'm not sure who paid for the $7.00 box lunches from Firebird’s, that were provided to everyone inside, but the fact that the event was public, but then at the last-minute made invitation only {private} makes me question the city’s real intentions on Holder’s visit. I'm not saying it wasn't nice to receive a free meal courtesy of the city but I did not understand why regular people were not allowed in this forum. There were about 25 box lunches left after everyone had eaten. I wanted to take them and give to the homeless, but I wasn’t allowed to do so. I guess the employees took them home you know this is Memphis. I am sure the good ole citizen’s of Memphis footed the bill for this entire event, which also consisted of an unusual entourage of secret service men and women, SUV’s and Vans to drive them throughout the city. With gas being at $2.25, I guess this was acceptable.

After eating our free meals, all of the persons who were on the “list” were permitted to go inside of the theater.20141209_125043 My name was on the media list but because certain people do not consider a blogger actual media my credentials were rejected. A lady name Meki Bracken, who works for Department of Justice, googled me on the spot. She opted not only to deny me entry but have the secret service watch me carefully. Ultimately, I was deprived of the right to hear Attorney Holder speak, so I don’t know what he said or if he said anything meaningful.

I did hear Director Tony Armstrong talk from a TV in the hallway while waiting to get inside the theater. As always I felt sorry for him, because, on the surface, he is very humble man and speaks of genuine concern of the crime in the city. He seems like a good officer overshadowed by an institution of several dysfunctional officers.

In my opinion, Armstrong was doomed from the beginning of his tenure. He has so many bad apples in his barrel and no real way to rid the department of them, especially since the internal affairs department offers no real checks and balance and a District Attorney who is clueless to what real crime is when it comes to a "blue shield". Prior to Armstrong's appointment, he held his head high but while speaking to this group his head was down for the most part. He began with how his mother raised him and the difference she made in his life. It is my opinion if Memphis had more officers with his rationale we could make progress and combat crime, but he is just one person.

While watching the director speak, I observed the same lady Meki Bracken give instructions to the secret service not to allow me entrance after a city official told her too. It was very disheartening to be denied entry by an African-American female, but the fact she told two Caucasian secret service agents to watch me was even more disturbing. I suppose she was doing her job. Hard as jobs are to come by, at the executive level, I guess we have to do as we are told as good house Negroes always do. Remember, these are the people who work for Attorney General Eric Holder, and this is the reason, no serious attention is given by the Justice Department to the issues going on in our communities. In my opinion, in 2014, there are too many house Negroes and not enough abolitionist, and that is why the police have declared war on blacks. It is important to weed out elitism and ignorance no matter what race. Affirmative Action only benefits those who understand how they arrived.

From what I have seen, this tour is a joke and a publicity stunt to distract and pacify protesters. It is also a waste of tax dollars because it brings no real clarity about the problems that are faced among blacks in America. I was denied access after being granted access because they were afraid I might confront Holder on the real issues, or because they wanted control the media. Holder’s tour consist of traveling to cities that he knows possess police problems and speaking to selected/elected individuals who are just simply not in touch with the black community. Most of them don’t even live there. Holder's staff was instructed by city officials to deny a person like myself, who is in touch with the black community, who does understand the real issues, and offer solutions an opportunity to address or even speak to him. Consequently, it is my belief they do not want to do anything about the problems because they are apart of the conundrum. The fact that this was a public forum but then subsequently made private illustrates the City of Memphis systematic corruption, which seeks to cover up real issues and not address any of the problems in our community.

Despite not being able to hear Attorney General Eric Holder speak, I was blessed with my own platform outside amongst the Memphis United protestors who welcomed me. I was able to give them suggestions and encourage them not to give up hope. Local radio and news press interviewed me about my opinions of the event inside and the issues of Ferguson. They were very organized, peaceful, and passionate about the problems in Memphis. There were no incidents, and the police were on their best behavior, when I appeared and few of them gave me nods.

Memphis is a city full of racial tension not just amongst Blacks but also amongst classes and socio-economics, which continues to divide the city. America is at a breaking point and if action is not taken we will soon live in a society like other countries that are not free.


I often visit the National Civil Rights museum just to pay homage to where Dr. King took his last breath. I always talk to tourists and find out where they are from when I am downtown. Ironically, tourist of the museum are always from another country. I enjoy meeting such interesting people because it gives me an opportunity to see our city through foreign eyes. Today, I met two Canadian food connoisseurs who greeted me with love and admiration for just merely speaking to them. I explained to them I have three uncles that live in Ontario and a cousin in Toronto. I sometimes reminisce when I was 16 and wish I could move to Canada. It was so different being black in Canada. I remember getting into a casino with no issues and traveling to Eaton’s, and no one followed me in the mall, and they didn’t even want to check my bags. The "Cooking Ladies" stated, that "Canadians are very trusting people." It dawned on me Americans are not. Our ideologies of others are so preconceived that we sometimes misjudge people. This is one of the biggest problems in America. We prejudge people. We as Americans refuse to give people the benefit of the doubt in most situations.

In closing, if I could have spoken to General Holder, I would have told him that it is important, that law enforcement convert immediately and their training should consist of reprogramming them, not to be so suspicious and learned to be more trusting of people. Just because a person is black doesn’t mean they are a criminal and just because a person is white doesn’t mean they are racist, and just because they are poor doesn't mean they don't have something to offer.

In the great words of Martin Luther King, “I hope that one day my four little children will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character, and that will speed up the day when all of God’s children black men, white men, Jew and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negros spiritual: Free at last Free at last thank God all mighty We are Free at last.”






http://prettypimp.wordpress.com/2014/12/11…

Posted by Justice Moses on 12/11/2014 at 6:18 AM

Re: “Short-changing Justice in Shelby County

At the end of the day just in the famous words of supreme court justice sotomayor "race matters" we live in a city where blacks make up close 29% of the judiciary and 73% of the actual population but the courts have 97% black ppl prosecuted daily not because they committed crimes but because they were black & accused of committing crimes. All black ppl are not criminals & all crimes shouldn't be prosecuted. A good judge knows this, and makes sound decisions. A good judge does require some judicial experience but if they follow the law and consult with advisory committees when they are unsure they will hardly ever break the law or require judicial review. I am glad to know that Judge Beasley will still be on the bench and hopefully he can guide these new judges properly and set a professional tone that will scream justice for all. No matter what any of you think change is Eminent and on the horizon either we can embrace it was resist it.
I can personally say after watching judge Beasley he has a decorum that is of impartiality and he is not afraid to admonish those who bring racial concerns in his division. I believe that's why he felt comfortable making these statements. As an Inercultuarist, I feel that it is important that we have these discussions about race it is very much needed in Memphis. The hatred of others is sickening and it is time for accountability and leadership & there is nothing wrong with bringing new fresh ideas ,faces, races, inexperience merging with seasoned judges to build on all those factors.

2 likes, 2 dislikes
Posted by Justice Moses on 07/16/2014 at 5:15 PM

Re: “Short-changing Justice in Shelby County

As a person who can truly say that Judge Beasley is a fair judge. I am glad I read the article instead of listening to the negative things people were saying. I think I understood what he was trying to say, but I must say experience is not what makes someone a good judge that's where you are wrong Judge, A good judge is a person who 1st and foremost understands the law. 2nd knows how to apply the law at the right time and 3rd is impartial no matter who is in front of them. Race matters in this election because "Our" {as amy wierich would say} ppl are oppressed and have been for quite sometime not your ppl. so judge it is impossible for you don't feel what is going on in our world, if every judge were like you then this topic would not matter but because you are amongst a good ole boy system that must fall we must elect those who understand us regardless of what experience they have. There are some judges who should stay but some who must GO! Experience matters with lawyers not {you don't even have to be a lawyer to be appointed to supreme court} judges on the other hand just need to know the law and be fair plain & simple!

4 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Pamela Alwaysgetsdalastlaugh Moses on 07/10/2014 at 5:24 PM

Re: “Malone, Weirich Hone Their Electoral Messages

Any Wierich is the Devil in disguise and she needs to go asap! Deidre for mayor!

18 likes, 8 dislikes
Posted by Pamela Alwaysgetsdalastlaugh Moses on 06/23/2014 at 9:26 PM
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