A New Home 

Memphis’ most recent Hope VI project opens in the shadow of Le Bonheur.

home.jpg

When fund-raising consultant Melvin Shaw lived in Dixie Homes during the late '40s/early '50s, it had a "great sense of community."

There was a pool, an elementary school, and a plethora of black-owned businesses, all within walking distance.

"Everybody knew everybody in Dixie Homes," Shaw said. "We never looked at it as low-income [housing]. It was a great place to live."

Local leaders are hoping that the $14 million Legends Park, a 28-acre Hope VI development located at the former site of Dixie Homes, will foster that same sense of community.

"This is not merely building buildings. This is about building homes," said Memphis mayor A C Wharton at a ribbon cutting for the first phase of the mixed-use development. "There's a difference between a house and a home."

Located in the shadow of the new Le Bonheur Children's Medical Center building, the development includes 134 units of multi-family housing at Legends Park East, the 24-family FedEx Family House, and a 9,000-square-foot pediatric rehabilitation facility.

The Women's Foundation of Greater Memphis also has pledged more than $7 million in job training and social services for residents.

Dixie Homes was Memphis' first public housing project for African Americans. The so-called Legends Park, named after the many residents of Dixie Homes who became prominent Memphians, is the city's sixth Hope VI project. The federal Hope VI program was created to revitizalize public housing.

The first "legend," honored last week, was Dorothy Butler Gilliam, the first African-American female reporter at The Washington Post. Gilliam said family members remembered Dixie Homes' hardwood floors and marble windowsills.

"My sister kept talking about how nice it was," she said. "It was a great place to come from."

Though Shaw and Gilliam remember a vibrant community, Memphis Housing Authority chair Ricky Wilkins cited the deplorable living conditions in public housing when he joined the board.

"The board members in 1992 made a pact that we were going to transform public housing in Memphis, Wilkins said. "We were going to leave it better than we found it.

"This looks as good as any development you'll find anywhere in the city."

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
    • Vulnerable Vista

      French Forters worry silos would obstruct river views.
    • Sounding the Call

      Memphians sound the alarm on drug death epidemic.

Blogs

News Blog

Meet the New Blue Suede Brigade

Fly On The Wall Blog

How Much News is on the News: A Guns & Bunnies Web Extra

Intermission Impossible

August Wilson's Metaphysical "Gem of the Ocean" Opens at The Hattiloo

Politics Beat Blog

Two Bites from the Thursday Night Smorgasbord

News Blog

Photo Contest Focuses on Memphis Bikes

News Blog

Live at the Garden guests prepare to party

News Blog

Bike Lanes and Plazas to Pop Up Downtown

Intermission Impossible

Nuremberg Revisited: An Indie Theater Company Does its Homework

ADVERTISEMENT

More by Mary Cashiola

Readers also liked…

ADVERTISEMENT
© 1996-2017

Contemporary Media
460 Tennessee Street, 2nd Floor | Memphis, TN 38103
Visit our other sites: Memphis Magazine | Memphis Parent | Inside Memphis Business
Powered by Foundation