Bigger and Brighter 

Circa 1929 bungalow in Evergreen.

It's a common complaint that bungalows are dark inside. A deep roof overhang and interior trim that's stained, not painted, are often to blame. So imagine my surprise when I encountered one of the brightest bungalows in Midtown, with its original stained trim.

Certainly having more windows per room than the average bungalow makes a huge difference. A pair of ten-light French doors flanked by double windows effectively makes the whole front wall of the living room glass. It also doesn't hurt that the last two owners have done extremely sensitive renovations. The prior owner did a major second-floor enlargement, and the current owner did significant interior improvements, as well as adding a rear studio and two-car garage. Furthermore, the current owner added lots of recessed, low-voltage can lights while maintaining the smooth, nine-foot ceilings.

The rich, red-gum trim has never been despoiled with paint. The interior color scheme of sages, golds, and terra-cottas feels neither dark nor oppressive. Accents like an earth-toned charcoal fireplace breast and deep, multicolored slates at the hearth only add drama to this interior.

The breakfast room, typically rather small, is frequently incorporated into a kitchen renovation to add space. Here, these discrete spaces are big enough to be left alone. The breakfast room comfortably holds a four-top table and its original heart pine butler's pantry. The kitchen was completely redone with top-of-the-line appliances and custom-depth cherry cabinets that fit snugly against all four walls, creating multiple work centers. Tops are black granite, and backsplashes are accented by handmade art-glass tiles. A light ceramic floor in these two rooms also brightens them, as do the multiple light sources from under cabinets, atop cabinets and overhead recessed. Finally, an antique door with ribbed, translucent glass transmits light through the pantry into the kitchen without adding a distracting note.

The remainder of the ground floor includes a screened porch, two bedrooms, a renovated bath, and a surprisingly large rear-entry hall that retains an original beadboard cabinet. The current owner built a garage with rear alley access and enough room for two small dump trucks and all the garden tools you'd ever need. A cathedral-ceilinged studio or workshop completes the rear structure.

Upstairs was originally a small, two-room rear "airplane" pop-up. The previous owners lifted more of the roof and expanded without any noticeable change from the street. The enlarged second floor now has two more bedrooms, two baths, a sitting room, and an office. The master here must have one of the largest walk-in closets inside the I-240 loop. The majority of the new rooms have oak flooring and wood trim and doors to match downstairs.

This is a seamlessly renovated house with no jarring breaks. It's deceptively larger than it appears from the street, and way brighter inside than the average bungalow. •

1783 Autumn

2,120 square feet

4 bedrooms, 3 baths; $329,000

Realtor: Hobson Realtors, 761-1622

Agent: Charlotte Lyles, 312-2938

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