Film Clips: Indie Memphis Sets Date and Other Fests News 

The Indie Memphis Film Festival has set the date for this year's festival, announcing it will run November 1st through 4th. It will also expand the festival footprint on Overton Square, adding Circuit Playhouse to returning venues Studio on the Square, Playhouse on the Square, and the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Two films that had local debuts at last year's Indie Memphis fest will be up for Oscars later this month, the docs Undefeated and Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory.

Meanwhile, the On Location: Memphis International Film & Music Festival, which will be held April 19th through 22nd at the Paradiso and Ridgeway Four, has announced its competition films for this year's fest, including In the Hive, the latest feature from comedian/filmmaker Robert Townsend (Hollywood Shuffle, The Five Heartbeats), a portrait of a 16-year-old boy from a rough background who finds himself with an infant son and in an alternative school. On Location will announce noncompetition films and other guests and events closer to the festival. For more information, see onlocationmemphis.org.

Before Indie Memphis or On Location are a couple of other festivals with local connections. This week, the Oxford Film Festival runs in Oxford, Mississippi, from February 9th through February 12th and will feature Mississippi premieres of a couple of local films that were prize-winners at last fall's Indie Memphis: Morgan Jon Fox's doc This Is What Love in Action Looks Like and Ryan Parker and G.B. Shannon's narrative short Fresh Skweezed. For a full schedule and more info, see oxfordfilmfest.com.

March's South by Southwest Film Festival in Austin, Texas, will feature some notable Memphis-connected films too: the documentary Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me, a portrait of the life and afterlife of the classic Memphis band featuring lots of footage and interviews of Memphis and Memphians; the feature Pilgrim Song from Indie Memphis vet and Kentucky-native director Martha Stephens (Passenger Pigeons), which has a lead performance from local actor Timothy Morton and was produced by the Memphis-based Paper Moon Films (a partnership of Ryan Watt and Nick Case); and Sun Don't Shine, the feature directorial debut of actress Amy Seimetz (Alexander the Last), which features a lead acting turn from Memphis filmmaker Kentucker Audley.

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