Here's an Idea: Grow Food on Memphis' Vacant Lots 

Here's an idea that could take root in Memphis. So to speak.

A nonprofit group in Detroit -- Memphis' unofficial sister city -- is farming derelict land to grow food for the needy.

NPR's "Morning Edition" says Urban Farming has a 20-plot pilot program in which volunteers tend the gardens and the city of Detroit picks up the water bill. The plots aren't fenced off, so anyone can pick the produce for free and anything leftover is donated to a food bank.

If that weren't enough, the program fights blight in a city that last year, with more than 7,000 idle properties, topped the nation in foreclosures ...

Read about urban farming, virtual scavenger hunts, and more interesting stuff in Mary Cashiola's In the Bluff blog.

Speaking of Community Development, Feed The Need

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Add a comment

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT

Blogs

Tiger Blue

Tigers 70, UCF 65

News Blog

Thousands Join Memphis Women's March

Politics Beat Blog

One Eye on The Memphis Women's March, January 21, 2017

News Blog

PODCAST: Two Flyer Guys and the Portland Protests

Beyond the Arc

Grizzlies 107, Kings 91: Game Notes

Intermission Impossible

Hitchcock, Cock Rock, and Bayard Rustin Live on Stage

Tiger Blue

Tigers 70, Houston 67 (OT)

News Blog

Sierra Club Protests Trump's EPA Choice

ADVERTISEMENT

More by John Branston

  • Pit Stops

    Ten BBQ joints worth a day trip from Memphis.
    • May 16, 2013
  • Where Do We Go From Here? | School Choice

    Modest voter turnouts notwithstanding, next week’s referendum is key to the schools’ future.
    • Mar 3, 2011
  • Great Deal or "Get Real"?

    Condos go for half-price in a unique Mindtown neighborhood.
    • Jul 28, 2010
  • More »

Readers also liked…

  • A Letter to the Memphis City Council

    The council gets an “F” for its performance on the Greensward decision.
    • Mar 10, 2016
  • Pay the Band

    Why we should be supporting proposed national music initiatives in Congress.
    • Aug 10, 2015
  • Detention Deficit

    Exactly seven years ago this week, I wrote a column decrying a proposal by city engineers to turn the Overton Park Greensward into an 18-foot-deep "detention basin" designed to stop flooding in Midtown. The engineers claimed we'd hardly notice the football-field-sized bowl. "Except," I wrote then, "when it rains hard, at which time, users of Overton Park would probably notice a large, 18-foot-deep lake in the Greensward. Or afterward, a large, muddy, trash-filled depression."

    • Mar 10, 2016
ADVERTISEMENT
© 1996-2017

Contemporary Media
460 Tennessee Street, 2nd Floor | Memphis, TN 38103
Visit our other sites: Memphis Magazine | Memphis Parent | Inside Memphis Business
Powered by Foundation