Letter From The Editor 

On Nathan B. Forrest and Wendi C. Thomas

click to enlarge img_36271-1024x768.jpg

I enjoy Commercial Appeal writer Wendi C. Thomas' columns. I mostly agree with her, and even when I don't, I appreciate her sass, intelligence, and wit. That said, her January 13th column, titled "Marker for Klan founder Forrest moved by KKK's worst nightmare: A powerful black man," was, as Thomas might say, something of a hot mess.

The column was about the removal of a sign put up by the Sons of Confederate Veterans in Forrest Park, which was detailed in last week's Flyer cover story by Jackson Baker. The basic facts are these: Lee Millar, writing as chairman of the Shelby County Historical Commission, offered to put up a new sign for the park. Cindy Buchanan, then the city's park director, responded in a letter to Millar: "The proposal to create a low, monument-style sign of Tennessee granite with the park name carved in the front was reviewed by park design staff and found to be appropriate in concept ... similar to the monument-style signage placed by the city at Overton Park."

George Little, the city CAO, and Mike Flowers, the administrator of park planning and development, were copied on Buchanan's letter.

Millar, who is also an officer of the local chapter of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, got the SCV to come up with the funds for the sign, and it was put up last spring. In October, county commissioner Walter Bailey sent Little a three-part file on the sign and asked that it be taken down.

In December, Baker asked Buchanan about the sign. She said she recalled being asked about the sign but that she "honestly [didn't] remember what I said to them about that." Uh huh. Little told Baker he could find no records of anyone having signed off on the new sign. Millar had no such problem finding the letter from Buchanan that was copied to Little, and he sent a copy to Baker.

In the week between Christmas and New Year's, Little had the sign removed. There is no doubt in my mind that Millar pulled a fast one in using his chairmanship of the Shelby County Historical Society as cover to get a sign erected by the SCV. But he did get city approval.

Thomas portrayed the whole affair as racial, with Little playing the role of a "strong black man" frustrating the Ku Klux Klan. But it seems to me that the removal of the sign was more likely a case of butt-covering by city officials. Demagoguing the affair as "black versus white" does no one any good.

Bruce VanWyngarden

brucev@memphisflyer.com

Comments (61)

Showing 1-25 of 61

 

Comments are closed.

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
    • Civil Rights and Civil Wrongs

      Oh would some power the giftie gie us, to see ourselves as others see us. — Robert Burns

      Scottish poet Robert Burns wrote the line above in response to seeing a louse on a high-born lady's bonnet at church. The point being, of course, that while we might think we're looking pretty good, someone else might be noticing a flaw we've overlooked.

Blogs

Fly On The Wall Blog

Donald the Great

Politics Beat Blog

Trump's Acceptance Address Aimed Beyond the GOP Base

Politics Beat Blog

A Temporary Truce Among Republicans

Politics Beat Blog

TRUMP — The Memphis Flyer Podcasts from the RNC #3

Film/TV/Etc. Blog

Politics And The Movies 1: All The President's Men

News Blog

Coliseum Repair Cost Lower Than Previous Estimate

ADVERTISEMENT

More by Bruce VanWyngarden

Readers also liked…

  • Vendor in the Grass

    The lady doth protest too much, methinks. — William Shakespeare

    Is there such a thing as "bad activism"? I'm asking because I'm seeing a lot of criticism of the folks who are protesting the Memphis Zoo's encroachment onto the Greensward at Overton Park.

    • Mar 31, 2016
  • In Spring ...

    (such a sky and such a sun

    i never knew and neither did you

    and everybody never breathed

    quite so many kinds of yes) — e. e. cummings

    • Apr 30, 2015
  • Detention Deficit

    Exactly seven years ago this week, I wrote a column decrying a proposal by city engineers to turn the Overton Park Greensward into an 18-foot-deep "detention basin" designed to stop flooding in Midtown. The engineers claimed we'd hardly notice the football-field-sized bowl. "Except," I wrote then, "when it rains hard, at which time, users of Overton Park would probably notice a large, 18-foot-deep lake in the Greensward. Or afterward, a large, muddy, trash-filled depression."

    • Mar 10, 2016
ADVERTISEMENT
© 1996-2016

Contemporary Media
460 Tennessee Street, 2nd Floor | Memphis, TN 38103
Visit our other sites: Memphis Magazine | Memphis Parent | Inside Memphis Business
Powered by Foundation