Recession Special 

Circa 1912 Craftsman bungalow in Glenview.

All right, you renters who assume you will never own a home, here's your chance, so don't blow it. This is a solid brick and stucco bungalow in a well-maintained Midtown neighborhood. And it's priced right!

Glenview is an early suburb developed just after the parkway system was laid out in 1904. The majority of houses in this historic district were built between 1910 and 1940. This one is prominently sited atop a high corner lot only two blocks from Glenview Park, which has a new community center and an active recreational program. The neighborhood lies just south of Cooper-Young at the intersection of Lamar and McLean.

This bungalow has the deep roof overhang typical of Craftsman bungalows. The inset front porch has massive stone columns, a broken terra-cotta tile floor, and a handrail of cut limestone. Out back is a detached two-car garage with a wide dormer filled with high windows that fill the interior with light.

Holly, abelia, forsythia, and snowball viburnums are used as foundation plantings. The shady rear yard is home to hydrangeas and hostas. The hill west of the house is filled in the spring with grape hyacinths. There are so many of these that they must have been planted soon after the house was built and have been multiplying for the last 90 years.

A large living room, dining room, and den run down the west side. The floors are a light-colored, narrow oak. The plaster ceilings are in good shape and nine feet high. The original black-gum trim and doors are unpainted in the main public rooms and a treat to behold.

Along the east side are two bedrooms, a newly renovated bath, and the kitchen/mudroom/back entry. The new bath has small, white ceramic tiles and a deep soaking tub with rain head shower. The large pedestal sink is flanked by sconces for efficient lighting. An unnecessary second door from the bathroom to the kitchen was wisely closed during the construction.

The kitchen renovation is in progress. The nasty job of peeling up the layers of linoleum and removing the glue has been done. The old heart-pine floor gleams anew. There is a great wall of original cabinets with glass doors on the top cupboards. The run of cabinets with sink is a bit dowdy but could easily be replaced.

The kitchen is wide enough for the new owner to consider installing a large island and relocate the sink. There is neither a stove nor a refrigerator, but the gas pipe and water outlets are in place. How hard is that?

Upstairs in a rear "airplane" (a partial second story frequently found on bungalows) are two more bedrooms with lots of windows and a large attic. The house has its original radiators and has been updated with window air conditioners. A brand-new roof was installed in the fall of 2007, and all the older roofs were stripped off and the decking repaired. Now, those are all the salient details but one: There's an assumable FHA mortgage that, including principal, interest, taxes, and insurance, comes to $805 a month, if you qualify. Need I say more?

1726 Kendale Avenue

Approximately 2,300 square feet

4 bedrooms, 1 bath; $89,000

Realtor: Crye-Leike, 276-8800

Agent: Elaine Muhammad,

949-2391

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