Tuesday, August 31, 2010

Best-selling Author Ford Due to Lose Tennessee Voting Rights

Posted By on Tue, Aug 31, 2010 at 11:58 PM

HaroldFordJr_2.jpg
More Davids Than Goliaths, the political memoir by former Memphis congressman Harold Ford Jr., has ascended to the Number four position on the Washington Post's bestseller list.

Ford's last public appearance in his erstwhile home was on August 18, when he addressed an audience at Davis-Kidd Booksellers and signed copies of his book. On that occasion Ford told his attentive audience that his political days were not over — though presumably they will have to continue in New York, both as candidate (earlier this year, Ford briefly considered a run for the Senate there) and as voter.

Ford was until this week a registered voter in both Tennessee, where for some time in 2008-9 he considered a run for governor, and the Empire State, where Ford now lives with his wife and which he considers his residence.

The circumstance of dual registration had been brought to the attention of Tennessee Secretary of State Tre Hargett by a complainant, with the result that Ford will likely be purged from the ranks of Tennessee voters. Or so Blake Fontenay, a spokesperson for Hargett, has indicated.

The status of Harold Ford Sr., also a former Memphis congressman, had been questioned as well but is regarded differently. Ford Sr., who like his son maintains a Memphis address, has apparently not registered to vote in Florida; therefore, his Tennessee registration is still good.

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