Spotlight

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Nightmare Before Christmas: Tennessee Shakespeare Closes Macbeth

Posted By on Thu, Nov 1, 2018 at 2:28 PM

Michael Khanlarian (Banquo), Paul Kiernan (Macbeth), and the Witches. Through Nov. 4. - TENNESSEE SHAKESPEARE COMPANY
  • Tennessee Shakespeare Company
  • Michael Khanlarian (Banquo), Paul Kiernan (Macbeth), and the Witches. Through Nov. 4.
Hard as it may seem to believe, winter is coming. It won't be long before area playhouses roll out stock scenery and turn their attention to holiday favorites. Theatre Memphis opens The 25th Putnam County Spelling Bee this weekend. And there are still a few more opportunities to catch Agatha Christie's enduring mystery The Mousetrap at Germantown Community Theatre. But if there's anybody out there who's not quite ready to put Halloween away just yet,Tennessee Shakespeare Company performs Macbeth through November 4th.

Shakespeare's witchy meditation on ambition and evil is directed by TSC's founder Dan McCleary and performed by a company of nine actors. How dark do things get? Here's what McCleary had to say via the TSC website:

“The witches are our masked Chorus, and a sacrifice is offered to cleanse a world of crimes against humanity. The sacrifice is a man who Shakespeare clearly defines as noble, generous, un-ambitious, indecisive, overly kind, incapable of lying with skill, morally incapable of imagining his own corruption or wrong-doing, courageous, patriotic, regretful, and a good husband and friend. Macbeth is the best of us. What is horrific is that we might be able to explain how he becomes the very worst of us.”
 

Very scary.

Thursday night's performance is Free Will Kids night. That means up to 4 kids (17 or under) are admitted with one paid adult ticket. 

Tennessee Shakespeare follows Macbeth with a  large cast production of  As You Like It Nov. 29-Dec. 6

General Admission tickets are $39. Performances are Thursday-Saturday at 7 p.m., and Sunday at 3 p.m.

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Friday, October 26, 2018

Memphis Actor/Comedian Harold Foxx Makes Off-Broadway Debut

Posted By on Fri, Oct 26, 2018 at 5:01 PM

Hanging with Harold Foxx - OUR AWESOME SERVER
  • Our awesome server
  • Hanging with Harold Foxx
The Old Testament character Job had his share of problems. He lost his home, his livelihood, his health, and his family. Craig Lucas' play I Was Most Alive With You, which recently took its last bows at Playwright's Horizons, may borrow heavily from the troubling Bible story, but none of that tragedy's rubbed off on Harold Foxx. The Memphis-born actor may have made his Off Broadway debut in Lucas' Job-inspired play, but he looks like a man on top of the world. Sitting in the Buffalo Wild Wings on Manhattan's W. 47th ("the one close to Playwright's Horizons"), Foxx' broad face practically glows with confidence.

"Did you see my New York Times spread," he asks by typing the words out on his phone and holding it up for me to see. I indicate that I have and tell him it looked great. He then types out a message saying he's waiting to see if the attention results in more work. If it does, he'll get excited about it.

Foxx is realistic about life as a working actor. He grew up in Orange Mound and graduated from White Station where he played football and made citywide headlines. Foxx is completely deaf. He's mostly silent. He's currently a professional actor, who lives in Los Angeles where he studies improv comedy with the Groundlings and auditions as often as possible. He doesn't think a Netflix special is out of the question. There's no reason to believe he won't get a shot at being in the next Black Panther movie. Nothing's for sure, but Foxx believes. He points to his personal inspiration, the deaf actor C.J. Jones who recently made his film debut in Edgar Wright's Baby Driver.

"My agent's good," he types.

Harold Foxx and Craig Lucas - COURTESY OF HAROLD FOXX
  • Courtesy of Harold Foxx
  • Harold Foxx and Craig Lucas
Foxx is as expressive as any silent film star. Every wrinkled brow or nostril flare writes a whole new story on his face. He describes this expressiveness as an artifact — something that just happens when you're in the deaf community. But there's precision to every eye-roll or pursing of the lips. There's timing, and it's good. You don't always need to read ASL to get the gist of his messaging. Critics noted his skills in I Was Most Alive With You, where the play's main speaking characters are mirrored by a shadow cast who perform a somewhat modified version of the show in ASL.

I caught up with Foxx in Manhattan, during the last week of his run at Playwright's Horizons. We "talked" about many things over wings, but did our official Q&A in a typed format. Here's a lightly edited version of that conversation.

Memphis Flyer: Wondering about life in Memphis. Did you know you wanted to act and do comedy when you were still living there?

Harold Foxx: Born and raised in Memphis. Native of Orange Mound. It’s funny how my comedy starts. Every morning the school bus picked me up. It was sorta of long ride. Then one day all of us kids on the bus just start to making jokes. From there I started doing comedy storytelling. That was in elementary school. And everybody laughs. Then, after school, when the bus takes us back home, everybody asked me for another comedy storytelling. And I start doing it again. Then somehow it became daily on the school bus, on the way to school and after school. Only difference is that I didn’t get paid that time. Since then, everybody sees my talents. Not only in comedy, but in acting too. Even my teachers in elementary school got me in school talent shows for dance and sign music. Plus, when I was in elementary school, the national theatre for the deaf came to my school and performed for us and I really looked up to them. Not only that. My former theater teacher Rita Grivich, who runs Deaf Drama & Theatre at White Station, always had a show. And when I was young, I'd always go there and watch the older kids perform. And I knew it would happen for me someday and glad that I was part of it.

MF: Memphis only has limited opportunities for actors, and the comedy scene has only begun to mature in the last few years. Guessing Paulette Reagan was a theater teacher at White Station? Were there many opportunities to experience and participate in comedy or theater?

Yes, Paulette Reagan and Rita Grivich were my theater teachers at White Station. Honest with you, I’m thankful to have had them as my teachers at White Station. When I was there, I was heavily involved in theater and it actually helps. It applies to what I’m doing today as an actor.

MF: When did you decide on comedy and acting as a career? And was there an obvious path for deaf performers or did you have to make your own?

Actually with all my experience and background as an actor from White Station High school under Paulette Reagan and Rita Grivich, they taught me a lot on what it takes to be an actor. When I graduated from White Station in 1999, I went to Gallaudet University in Washington, D.C.,  where I graduated and also played college football there. Everybody expected me to join the theater at Gallaudet University but I didn’t get involved in theater productions. I focused on football. But I took a couple of theater courses at Gallaudet. So, when I graduated, I started to work as a football coach, personal trainer, and physical education teacher. Somehow my acting passion hits me again one day and I started doing some comedy sketches on Vine apps. It changed my whole life. Now I’m doing acting/comedy as a career, full time. Most of all I started this out on my own from looking up to my role model like CJ Jones, John Maucere, Redd Foxx, Richard Pryor, Chris Rock, Jamie Foxx, etc..
Past show flyer
  • Past show flyer
MF: I love silent film, and your comedy reel was a joy to watch because it has the expressiveness of great silent comedy. Funny enough to transcend any biases hearing audiences might have. Curious as to which actors and comics might have inspired you?

I started on Vine Apps. Of course, as deaf person, I can’t hear a sound or music. Most of my sketches were based on body language and physical comedy so it can be accessible to both hearing and deaf audiences. It started similar to silent film — like my favorite comic who did all amazing in silent film, Charlie Chaplin. Then I started my internship at DPAN.TV (Deaf Professional Arts Network) where I learned to make better quality work — script, film, edit. Plus, they have a sound engineer who installs all sounds and music. My comedy video went to a whole different level. That’s when I started getting recognized for my work and getting opportunities in acting and comedy.

MF: How did you land the role in I Was Most Alive With You? And was working on it like anything you’ve done before? Looking at the behind-the-scenes videos, the process looks like it must have been unique and difficult.

Yes. It’s different from what everybody's already seen from my work as a comedian or doing sketches on the video. I was in a production of Our Town last year by Pasadena Playhouse and Deaf West Theatre. That’s where everybody recognized my work on stage in theater. I’m not only limited to comedy. I can do variety range of work as an actor. Actually how did I land the role? I was in Jamaica doing stand up comedy and then I got an email from my agent. They asked for my video audition, but at that time I wasn’t really interested because I didn’t want to move to NYC. I’m still new in LA. Then one friend convinced me. Said, "It’s Off Broadway." And that’s a good start for my career. So I decide to do the video audition and I got offered the job. So, I’m thankful for this opportunity because I got to work with amazing talented of actors and actresses plus Craig Lucas and Tyne Rafaeli.

MF: Do you think the show’s accurate in its depiction of hearing impaired people, and culture?

We do both as English spoken and ASL, it’s a very heavy play and powerful at the same time and it’s very accessible to both audience.

MF: Has the run been rewarding? And is it difficult to put away as closing night approaches?

We had a very successful run, but at the same time we wish it could be extend more.

MF: Has the run of this show resulted in more opportunities, or is it back to the audition grind?

I’m hoping this production will get me more opportunities. I mean, it’s not easy as deaf actors/actresses because we don’t get a same opportunity as hearing actors/actresses. They might get an audition daily when we, as deaf actors and actresses, are probably lucky to get 2 or maybe 3 auditions a month. But for me, it’s all about hustling. Show your work out there and create your own work. That’s why I created a bunch of short comedy sketches. Now I’m writing my new stand up comedy material and working on a film script. Who knows, I might produce a feature film and act in it someday instead waiting for someone to offer me the opportunity. Always have your own work ready to go.


MF: I know you’ve been training with The Groundlings — which is great! But wondering what’s next, and if you have a preference for sketch/standup over other kinds of performance?


Right now I’m still in training and taking classes at the Groundlings. Sometimes I put it on hold if I get an opportunity like Off Broadway in NYC. But now my agent and I are working on something. Be aren’t sure yet. But for the Groundings, my training continues. Who knows? Maybe one day I will end up on SNL or Comedy Central.

MF: Do you ever make it back to Memphis? What’s the best way for folks back home to experience what you do?

I finally made back to Memphis last summer after seven years. I did a homecoming standup show there and am hoping to do it again soon. Memphis is my hometown, roots, and where I started. One thing I would tell Memphis folks, if they are pursing what I’m doing, it starts with passion and hard work. Create your work and get some training with a top acting or improv class to develop some network.

Click here for more on Harold Foxx

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College Theaters Stage Festival of Plays by Pulitzer Winner Lynn Nottage

Posted By on Fri, Oct 26, 2018 at 4:46 PM

44702797_10105340919955391_912555996348416000_n.jpg
Three local college theater programs are staging work by Pulitzer Prize winning playwright Lynn Nottage. Collectively, it's called, “NottageFest." One play is being performed on each campus with an "intercollegiate finale," Sunday, November 11th, at the Dixon Gallery and Gardens.

Southwest Community College, Verties Sails Building, Room 113

Crumbs From the Table of Joy (premiered 1995)

Directed by Sheila Darras

Oct. 26 and Nov. 2 at 12:30 p.m.

Oct. 27 and Nov. 3 at 7 p.m.

Oct. 28 and Nov. 4 at 3 p.m.

All tickets are free and available at the door.

www.tn.edu/theater



The University of Memphis, Theatre Arts Building

Intimate Apparel (premiered 2003)

Directed by Dennis Whitehead-Darling

Nov. 1-3 & 8-10, 7:30 p.m. each night

All tickets are $25 for adults, $20 for seniors and students

Purchase in advance at www.memphis.edu/theatre/currentseason/intimate.php



Rhodes College, McCoy Theatre

Fabulation or, The Re-Education of Undine (premiered 2004)

The play is about Undine Barnes Calles, an ambitious African-American woman in the early days of the Obama era whose best-laid plans don’t go accordingly. On the brink of social and financial ruin, Undine retreats to her childhood home and forgotten family only to discover she must cope with her cruel new reality and figure out how to transform her setbacks into small victories.

Directed by Thomas King

Nov. 9 & 10, 15-18, 7:30 p.m. each night, except the 2 p.m. Sunday matinee.

All tickets are free,but reservations are recommended by contacting the McCoy Box Office at mccoy@rhodes.edu or (901) 843-3839

www.rhodes.edu/mccoy

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Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Ostranders 2018: Picks, Pans, and "Who Got ROBBED?!?!"

Posted By on Tue, Aug 21, 2018 at 11:35 AM

Maness 4-ways.
  • Maness 4-ways.
You know what? As long as John Maness wins something, I don’t care about anything else this year. If the Ostrander committee misses all the rest by miles and miles, I’ll be satisfied for the ounce of justice done. Because … holy crap! After this season, the O-committee should consider a “John Maness hardest-working-person in Memphis Theater” trophy. With a roll-up-your-sleeves work ethic married to the soul of a magician and escape artist, he hammers out one unique character after another and vanishes inside them. I mean, who the hell does this guy think he is, Erin Shelton?

Nevertheless, the time has come, once again, for shade to be cast and predictions made in regard to this year’s crop of nominees and nominees that might have been if only the universe wasn’t so frequently unfair. It’s the season when the Intermission Impossible team wonders what it is our tireless, too human Ostrander judges might be smoking. When we ask the one question on every right-thinking thespian’s mind — “WHO GOT ROBBED?”

I want to see J. David Galloway take home the set design for New Moon’s lovely, immersive, and necessarily inventive design for Eurydice. I’ve been frustrated in the past by designers who quote or wink at surrealism when what’s needed is something approaching the real thing. Not every aspect of Galloway’s design was as dreamy as it might have been, but the microbudget masterpiece engaged imaginations, enabling the kind of stage magic money can’t buy.
That said, bigger, better-funded companies still have advantages in design categories and I suspect the judges may prefer Jack Yates’ outstanding work on The Drowsy Chaperone or the ordinary otherworldliness of Tim McMath’s design for Fun Home at Playhouse on the Square.

But what about the eye-candy that was An Act of God (also Yates)? What about 12 Angry Jurors, an environment so real yet another confounded patron tried to use the onstage bathroom (also Yates)? If it sounds like I’m arguing for more Jack Yates nominations, maybe I am. But I’m also making a case that there’s been some good design this season, and given a different set of sensibilities, this category might have swung another direction entirely. There might have been nods for the elegant emptiness of Bryce Cutler’s Once, at Playhouse on the Square, or the grubby, unfussy realism of Phillip Hughen’s design for The Flick at Circuit Playhouse. I look forward to seeing how this category evolves as New Moon continues to mature, and smaller Memphis’ companies leverage thoughtfulness against more tangible resources. 
Falsettos.
  • Falsettos.

It’s wrong that Mandy Heath wasn’t nominated for lighting Falsettos but I can live with the slight as long as she wins the prize for Eurydice. That’s really all I have to say about that.

Once is a stunt musical — and what a terrific stunt! It’s part concert, part narrative drama, with the actors doubling down as their own orchestra. The three-chord score’s not Sondheim but casting players who are also, well... players isn’t easy. And pulling off a piece musical theater where the songs feel more like barroom romps than show tunes, requires a different kind of sophistication. I suspect the thrice-nominated Nathan McHenry will take this prize. He should take it for Once.

Who got robbed? Maybe nobody this year.

For excellence in sound design there are a few nominees, but really only one choice. Joe Johnson’s dreamy original score for Eurydice didn’t enhance the designed environment. It completed it.

I was happy to see choreographers Ellen Inghram and Jared Johnson nominated for the wit and wisdom permeating their work on Falsettos. It would be nice to see them win over the flashier entries in this category. No robberies here.

When it comes to the non-musicals, best female lead and supporting roles are almost always the toughest category to call because year after year they are overstuffed with contenders. While Kim Sanders was her usual perfect self in both A Perfect Arrangement and Laughter on the 23rd Floor, the double nomination in the supporting category may not double her odds against commanding, emotionally wrenching turns by Jessica “Jai” Johnson in Ruined and Erin Shelton in All Saints in the Old Colony. Kell Christie was the best Emelia I’ve ever seen and a perfect match for John Maness’ woman-hating Iago in New Moon’s Othello. Any other year Christie would be my #1 pick. She’s a longshot compared to Shelton and Johnson and I’m hard pressed to say who’s more deserving of the honor.
Opera 901 Showcase
  • Opera 901 Showcase
Who got robbed? Although FEMMEemphis’ productions aren’t under consideration, basically the entire cast of Collective Rage. Quark’s similarly out of the running but in the young company’s very adult production of The Nether, young Molly McFarland stood shoulder to shoulder with grownup co-stars and delivered a brave, polished performance. As the youngest of the Weston daughters in Theatre Memphis’ tepid August: Osage County, Emily F. Chateau was damn near perfect — as fragile as Laura Wingfield’s glass unicorn and as likely to cut you if broken. ROBBED AS HELL!

Anne Marie Caskey does consistently professional work but she seemed miscast in Theatre Memphis’ not altogether successful production of August: Osage County. Ostrander loves Caskey (as do I) and her inclusion here might seem less bewildering if not for the absence of Michelle Miklosey’s pitch perfect Eurydice  Tracy Hansom's good old fashioned curtain chew in Stage Kiss. Were I one of these two ladies, I’d take The Oblivains strong advice and call the police. Because, ROBBED! OMG ROBBED!

Some of the best female leads this season did their thing just outside Ostrander’s natural reach. Jillian Baron and Julia Baltz were equally badass in FEMMEmphis’ Desdemona: A Play About a Handkerchief. But let’s be real. All this talk of robbery is purely academic because each of these fantastic performances paled next to to Maya Geri Robinson’s larger-than-life depiction of a Congolese Mother Courage in Ruined at Hattiloo. And Robinson's performance may have only been the season’s second best. I can’t say with any confidence that I’ve ever seen an actor own a show like Morgan Watson owned Sunset Baby, also at Hattiloo.
Emily F. Chateau. The F stands for F-ing ROBBED!
  • Emily F. Chateau. The F stands for F-ing ROBBED!

The list for Best Supporting Actor is strong. It’s so strong I’m picking Bertram Williams for Ruined even though I started this column cheering for John Maness in anything. The list of nominees might also have included nods to Jeff Kirwan for his performances in New Moon’s Buried Child, Eurydice or both. It's worth noting (yet again) that every performance in All Saints in the Old Colony approached a personal best and Marques Brown was ROBBED!

I don’t know what the theater judges had against Buried Child but James Dale Green’s Dodge is a glaring best actor omission. So is Emmanuel McKinney, who gave a knockout performance as Muhammad Ali in the uneven Fetch Clay, Make Man. Both of these men should post on Nextdoor.com right away to let everybody know they were ROBBED! Once that’s been done, can we please all agree to give this year’s prize to John Maness? And can we go ahead make it for everything he touched this season? I say this with deep appreciation for and apologies to All Saints’ Greg Boller and Jitney’s Lawrence Blackwell who both delivered special, award-worthy performances in a season where the competition happened to be a little stiffer than usual.

I take it from the sheer number of nominations in the category of Best Supporting Actress in a Musical, the Ostrander judges liked Fun Home. Me too. But maybe not enough to give any category a near sweep. Especially when it might be appropriate to co-nominate Fun Home’s small and medium Alison in order to make room for Falsettos’ Jaclyn Suffel and/or Christina Hernandez who were both ROBBED!

A taste of Once's pre-show jam.
Like I said, Ostrander very clearly likes Fun Home this year with the odd exception of adult Alison, Joy Brooke-Fairfield. So, individual nominations aside, I’m predicting a joint win for the two Alisons. Of course Annie Freres was a force of nature as the title character in The Drowsy Chaperone. All else being equal, she was probably the most outstanding nominee in a field of outstanding nominees.

Best Female Lead in a Musical is a heartbreaker category because everybody nominated is ridiculously talented. Nobody in town has pipes like DreamgirlsBreyannah Tillman, who’s also proving to be a formidable actor. But Emily F. Chateau also had an amazing year and may have been better in Falsettos than she was in August: Osage County. Gia Welch is a precocious powerhouse. She was great in Chaperone, but might also have been nominated for work on 42nd Street or Heathers. Meanwhile, Once’s Lizzy Hinton and Shrek’s Lynden Lewis occupy opposite corners of this playing field. The former helped build a complete world out of song and mirrors.The later was almost buried in spectacle but made heart and soul so much more important than green makeup and ogre costumes.

Let me let you in on a secret: Like Lena Younger’s striving son Walter, Patricia Smith was ROBBED! She should have gotten a nod for her work in the musical adaptation of A Raisin in the Sun. I’m gonna talk about Raisin later on in this seemingly endless column, but frankly, that whole cast might want to call a personal injury attorney because they were dealt a disservice up front then ripped off by out appraisers!

Given all of Fun Home’s nominations in other categories, the omission of Joy Brooke-Fairfield feels oddly pointed. Fun Home’s a show that might challenge traditional gender divisions in these kinds of awards and when I didn’t see the older Alison included in this category, I so I double checked the whole list to make sure I wasn’t missing anything. But there was no Joy to be found anywhere, and that sentence is every bit as sad as it sounds. ROBBED!

I’d like to see Joshua Pierce win the Best Supporting Actor in a Musical category for Theatre Memphis’ superlative take on Falsettos. But I missed First Date and Dreamgirls this season and, truth be told, I don’t understand Shrek’s appeal. Too disoriented by this category to make a fair call. That almost never happens. Y'all tell me.

Best Leading Actor in a Musical is yet another heartbreaker category. Shrek’s never going to be my thing, but it’s very clearly Justin Asher’s, and he was a mighty fine ogre,  loving every second of big green stage time. Stephen Huff was so at home in Fun Home it’s now almost impossible for me to imagine anybody else in his role. And I kinda feel the same about Jason Spitzer’s near definitive take on The Drowsy Chaperone’s Man in Chair. But I've gotta say, having been underwhelmed by his pitchy turn in Heathers, I was most impressed by Conor Finnerty-Esmonde's take on the hard-luck musician in Once. But when I filter out personal taste in music and storytelling and just let myself focus on the difficulty and potency of the performances represented here, one actor’s work really stands out. Villains are fun to play but nothing's harder than a complex character who's hard-to-like but can't be allowed to become a villain. Cary Vaughn, in his finest of many fine performances, plowed through Falsettos like a steamroller. Still standing. Still applauding this entire cast.
Eurydice — Awfully good looking.
  • Eurydice — Awfully good looking.
But what about Kortland Whalum? Where is his name? I’ll be the first to admit, Raisin was tragically underproduced. The scenic environment felt unfinished, and in an intimate space like Hattiloo, nothing sucks the soul from musical performances like warm bodies performing to cold tracks. But somehow, in spite of everything the actors had working against them, Raisin’s cast collectively overcame. I can’t blame the Ostrander for not rewarding the production, but when you factor in the odds against, no cast was more ROBBED than this one. I’ll brook zero argument: No actor deserves to this category half as much as Whalum. Folks are welcome to disagree on this point, but folks who do are flat wrong. ROBBED!

If Jamel “JS” Tate doesn’t win Best Featured Performer in a Drama for Jittny I’m personally calling in the FBI. Annie Freres is likely to win Best Featured in a musical for her flashy roll-on as the Dragon in Shrek. Or maybe it will go to Breyannah Tillman, who stuck the landing in her role as The Drowsy Chaperone’s show-stopping aviatrix. But James Dale Green stopped time with nothing but his weatherbeaten tenor, a strummed mandolin, and a compelling story to tell. That sounds like a winner to me. Who got Robbed? Once’s Chris Cotton, that’s who.

I’m totally happy if the Ensemble award goes to All Saints in the Old Colony, Falsettos, Fun Home, Jitney, or A Perfect Arrangement. All are deserving, though Jitney may be just a little bit more deserving than all the rest. But how in the blankety-blankblanblank did Once not make this list? The cast doesn’t just act together, they also make music together — acoustic music. Music largely unaided by electronics and amplification. Music so thoroughly human it connects past and future like a time machine made of skin, bone, wood and string. I’m happy if the award goes to any of the fantastic nominees, but no matter who wins the judges lose on this account. Once was the season’s ultimate ensemble show, and POTS’s ensemble crushed it. The pre-show hoedown was worth the price of admission. BOO!

As long as I’m complaining about the judges, OMG! Why is Tony Isbell nominated for excellence in direction of a drama for Death of a Streetcar Named Virginia Woolf? Don’t misunderstand, I come to praise this year’s lifetime achievement honoree, not to dis him. Isbell absolutely should have been nominated in this category, but for his work on The Nether (not eligible). Or his work on Years to the Day (also not eligible). Or maybe even his work on Stage Kiss (eligible and solid but fuck-you ignored). I’d go so far as to say he got ROBBED! in spite of bing nominated. This insubstantial work is a jarring inclusion next to Dr. Shondrika Moss-Bouldin’s unflinching approach to Ruined and the inventiveness of Jamie Boller’s Eurydice. Not to mention the hyper-detailed character development, and ensemble work Jeff Posson oversaw for All Saints in the Old Colony and the flawless world-building of Steve Broadnax’s Jitney. I’m calling this one for Posson, but it could go in almost any direction.

Best production of a drama? I like Jitney, though I’ve not pegged it as a winner in many other categories. Sometimes the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, and that’s the case here, though the parts were also quite good. Should All Saints in the Old Colony win, it’s every bit as deserving and, being a new script and the underdog here, maybe even more deserving.

I’m betting the darkhorse for excellence in Direction of a Musical and calling this one for Jerry Chipman and Falsettos. Everything else was bigger or flashier or more current in some way or another, even the stripped down Once. But life’s about balance, and Chipman’s production had nary a hair out of place that wasn’t supposed to be out of place.


Looking at the nominee spread, my gut tells me Fun Home was the judges’ favorite musical this season, and why wouldn't it be? It was flawlessly cast, and beautifully performed. But this wasn't the best work I’ve seen from director Dave Landis. I saw the performance with two companions. One wept openly, responding to the story and the characters. The other complained all the way home about the musical’s almost complete lack of action and visual/physical dynamics. I became the most unpopular person in the car when I said I thought they were both 100-percent right to feel the way they felt. Up to this point I’ve been #TeamFalsettos but I’m calling this one for Once. The other shows were great, but they were shows. Once was an event.

“Theaters not actively engaged in creating new material are passively engaged in their own obsolescence.” — Me.

Yeah, I totally quoted myself, but there’s not much I believe more than that. It’s one of the reasons I think the Ostrander Awards for Best Original Script and Best Production of an Original Script, may be more important than nice. In the future, judges might even consider beating the bushes a little on this front, and looking beyond the usual qualifying companies. All Saints in the Old Colony is a fantastic new script. It will win these categories, and it will know productions and awards beyond Memphis. But now would be a good time for all the folks who contributed words and music to Opera Memphis’ all-original 901 Opera Festival to cancel their credit cards because they have been ROBBED! OM might not be under consideration, but if we’re looking for superlatives, I can’t recall a more impressive example of new musical theater in the 901. Not 
Tony Isbell in "Red"
  • Tony Isbell in "Red"
since OM’s 2014 production of Ghosts of Crosstown heralded the rebirth of a neighborhood.

That may not cover every category, but it’s all I’ve got for now. Who did I forget?

Also, stay tuned for a Q&A with lifetime achievement honoree Tony Isbell.

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Tuesday, August 7, 2018

It's Time for Ostrander Nominees, 2018!

The Memphis Theater Awards are Aug. 26, at The Orpheum

Posted By on Tue, Aug 7, 2018 at 1:00 PM

Dreams, Saints, Fences
  • Dreams, Saints, Fences
Congratulations Memphis Theater people — especially this season's nominees! Ostrander season, 2018 has officially begun.

Tickets are available at this link. Additional details can be found here. Thanks as always to Memphis magazine and ArtsMemphis for making things happen. And your nominees are...

College Division

Set Design
The Wild Party - Brian Ruggaber, University of Memphis
The Secret in the Wings, University of Memphis - Andy Bleiler
Violet - Montana Pugh, McCoy Theatre, Rhodes in collaboration with the U of M

Costume Design
The Secret in the Wings - Becca Bailey
Nine - Jennifer Ammons, University of Memphis
The Servant of Two Masters - jennifer ammons

Lighting Design
The Secret in the Wings - Nicholas F. Jackson
Nine - Anthony Pellecchia
Violet - Emily Murphy

Music Direction
Nine - Jason Eschhofen
Violet - Tracy Thomas
The Wild Party - Jacob Allen

Choreography
The Wild Party - Jill Guyton Nee
Nine - Jill Guyton Nee

Supporting Actress in a Drama
Five Women Wearing the Same Dress - Hiawartha Jackson, Southwest
The Servant of Two Masters - Jasmine Robertson
Cabs, Ogres, Fun
  • Cabs, Ogres, Fun
Leading Actress in a Drama
The Servant of Two Masters, Jordan Hartwell
Five Women Wearing the Same Dress, Jhona C. Gipson
Five Women Wearing the Same Dress, Rashidah Gardner

Supporting Actor in a Drama
The Servant of Two Masters - Toby Davis
The Servant of Two Masters - Tyler Vernon
The Secret in the Wings - Kyle Buchanan

Leading Actor in a Drama
Theophilus North - Ryan Gilliam, McCoy Theatre, Rhodes College
The Servant of Two Masters - Blake Currie

Supporting Actress in a Musical
Nine - Brittni Taylor Rhodes
Violet - Destiny Freeman
The Wild Party - Emily Collins

Leading Actress in a Musical
The Wild Party, Kennedy Staiger
Nine, Ellie Boisseau
Violet, Jenny Wilson

Supporting Actor in a Musical
Violet - Jason McCloud
Nine - Nathan Morton
The Wild Party - Christian Boyd

Leading Actor in a Musical
Violet - Deon'ta White
The Wild Party - Jacob Clanton
Nine - Tyler Vernon

Featured/Cameo Role
Violet - Jaylon Jazz McCraven
The Secret in the Wings - Blake Curry
The Secret in the Wings - Levarius Goods


Excellence in Direction of a Drama
The Servant of Two Masters - Danica Horton
Five Women Wearing the Same Dress - Thomas King

Excellence in Direction of a Musical
Nine - Stephen Hancock
Violet - Karissa Coady
The Wild Party - Mark Schnitzler

Best Production
Violet
Nine
The Servant of Two Masters

Community and Professional Division

Excellence in Set Design
Ekundayo Bandele, Jitney, Hattiloo
J. David Galloway, Eurydice, New Moon
Jack Yates, Drowsy Chaperone, Theatre Memphis
Jack Yates, Shrek, Theatre Memphis
Tim McMath, Fun Home, Playhouse on the Square
Dragons, Gods*, Modernity
  • Dragons, Gods*, Modernity
Excellence in Costume Design
Amie Eoff, Drowsy Chaperone
Amie Eoff, Shrek
Kathleen Kovarik, Dreamgirls, Playhouse on the Square
Lindsay Schmeling, Perfect Arrangement, Circuit Playhouse
Patricia Smith, Jitney

Excellence in Props Design
Aubanita Kirk, Perfect Arrangement
Betty Dilley, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Germantown Community Theatre
Jack Yates, August: Osage County, Theatre Memphis
Jack Yates, Shrek
Katharine Hughen, 9 to 5, Playhouse on the Square

Excellence in Hair/Wig/Makeup Design
April Rose Korpitz, Eurydice
Buddy Hart, Drowsy Chaperone
Buddy Hart and Rence Phillips, 42nd Street, Theatre Memphis
Buddy Hart, Rence Phillips, Charles McGowan, Shrek
Lindsay Schmeling, Perfect Arrangement

Excellence in Sound Design
Carter McHann, Crib, POTS@TheWorks
Carter McHann, Death of a Streetcar Named Virginia Woolf, Circuit Playhouse
Eric Sefton, Shrek
Joe Johnson, Eurydice
Zachary Badreddine, Jitney

Excellence in Lighting Design
Jeremy Allen Fisher, Drowsy Chaperone
Jeremy Allen Fisher, Shrek
Mandy Kay Heath, Eurydice
Justin Gibson, Once
Zo Haynes, Fun Home

Excellence in Music Direction
Jeffrey Brewer, Drowsy Chaperone
Jeffrey Brewer, Shrek
Nathan McHenry, Dreamgirls
Nathan McHenry, Fun Home
Nathan McHenry, Once

Excellence in Choreography
Christi Hall, 42nd Street
Ellen Inghram & Jared Johnson, Falsettos, Next Stage, Theatre Memphis
Kim Sanders, Fun Home
Travis Bradley & Jordan Nichols, Drowsy Chaperone
Travis Bradley & Jordan Nichols, Shrek

Best Supporting Actress in a Drama
Erin Shelton, All Saints in the Old Colony POTS@TheWorks
Jessica “Jai” Johnson, Ruined, Hattiloo
Kell Christie, Othello, New Moon
Kim Sanders, Laughter on the 23rd Floor, Circuit Playhouse
Kim Sanders, Perfect Arrangement

Best Leading Actress in a Drama
Anne Marie Caskey, August: Osage County, Theatre Memphis
Jamie Boller, Shakespeare in Love, Playhouse on the Square
Jessica “Jai” Johnson, Fences, Theatre Memphis
Maya Geri Robinson, Ruined
Morgan Watson, Sunset Baby, Hattiloo

Best Supporting Actor in a Drama
Bailey Dumlao, Lost in Yonkers Germantown Community Theatre
Benjamin Greene, Fences
Bertram Williams, Ruined
John Maness, All Saints in the Old Colony
Justin Raynard Hicks, Fences
Tommy “TC” Sharpe, Jitney

Best Leading Actor in a Drama
Greg Boller, All Saints in the Old Colony
John Maness, Othello
John Maness, The Flick, Circuit Playhouse
Lawrence Blackwell, Jitney
Marques Brown, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf

Best Supporting Actress in a Musical
Annie Freres, Drowsy Chaperone
Brooke Papritz, Fun Home
Carla McDonald, Fun Home
Heather Zurowski, Fun Home
Sarah Johnson, Fun Home

Best Leading Actress in a Musical
Breyannah Tillman, Dreamgirls
Emily Chateau, Falsettos
Gia Welch, Drowsy Chaperone
Lizzie Hinton, Once
Lynden Lewis Jones, Shrek

Best Supporting Actor in a Musical
Cordell Turner, Dreamgirls
Jimmy Hoxie, First Date
Joshua Pearce, Falsettos
Kevar Maffitt, Shrek
Napoleon Douglas, Dreamgirls

Best Leading Actor in a Musical
Justin Asher, Shrek
Stephen Huff, Fun Home
Jason Spitzer, Drowsy Chaperone
Conor Finnerty-Esmonde, Once
Cary Vaughn, Falsettos

Best Featured Performer in a Drama
Ann Marie Hall, Shakespeare in Love
Greg Fletcher, August: Osage County
Jamel “JS” Tate, Jitney
Jason Spitzer, Shakespeare in Love
The Stones, Eurydice

Best Featured Performer in a Musical
Annie Freres, Shrek
Breyannah Tillman, Drowsy Chaperone
James Dale Green, Once
Jason Eschhofen, First Date, Germantown Community Theatre
Tamara Wright, 9 to 5

Ensemble
All Saints in the Old Colony
Falsettos
Fun Home
Jitney
Perfect Arrangement
Myths, Sports, Sunsets, Chaperones
  • Myths, Sports, Sunsets, Chaperones
Excellence in Direction of a Drama
Dr. Shondrika Moss-Bouldin, Ruined
Jamie Boller, Eurydice
Jeff Posson, All Saints in the Old Colony
Steve Broadnax, Jitney
Tony Isbell, Death of a Streetcar Named Virginia Woolf, Circuit Playhouse

Best Production of a Drama
All Saints in the Old Colony
Eurydice
Jitney
Perfect Arrangement
Ruined

Excellence in Direction of a Musical
Cecelia Wingate, Shrek
Dave Landis, Fun Home
Jerry Chipman, Falsettos
Jordan Nichols, Dreamgirls
Jordan Nichols, Once
Travis Bradley & Jordan Nichols, Drowsy Chaperone

Best Production of a Musical
Drowsy Chaperone
Falsettos
Fun Home
Once
Shrek
Dreamgirls

Best Original Script
Some Day for a Crown
All Saints in the Old Colony
Crib

Best Production of an Original Script
Some Day for a Crown
All Saints in the Old Colony
Crib

Once, Perfect, Flicks, and more Flicks
  • Once, Perfect, Flicks, and more Flicks
* Totally not nominated for anything. But look at that set! Check those lights! And remember, to check back with Intermission Impossible for Ostrander-related features including memorials, an interview with lifetime achievement honoree Tony Isbell, as well as picks, pans, and "Who got robbed?!?!

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Thursday, July 26, 2018

For Your Consideration: Tell the 2018 Ostrander Judges Who to Nominate

Posted By on Thu, Jul 26, 2018 at 2:39 PM

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The Ostrander Awards are scheduled to go off Sunday, August 26th. The judges have not yet convened, and it's only a matter of days now before the haggling begins over who gets nominated for one of Memphis' coveted theater awards, and who goes home with the plaque. In other words, if there was ever a time to make your feelings known as to who you think they should choose, now would be the time to make some noise. I'm suggesting not that any of our upstanding judges could ever be swayed by outside influence. But it sure can't hurt and might even be fun to try.

What I'm proposing is that theater fans post their own "for your consideration" suggestions in comments here, or on the social media platform of your choosing. You can make it text only, or — if you're feeling creative — make Academy Awards-style "for your consideration" ads and share them around. My only request is, if you make ads, either email a copy to me or tag me when you post it. If we get enough I'll create a second post with the best homemade ads out there.

For my sample I picked John Maness because that guy could easily be nominated in a couple of categories, and absolutely deserves a play prize this year.

Have fun and stay tuned to Intermission Impossible for Ostrander updates including nominees, interviews with honorees, and this year's installment of WHO GOT ROBBED?!?!

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Friday, July 13, 2018

Summer Stock: Revues, Debuts in this Week's Weekend Theatre Roundup

Posted By on Fri, Jul 13, 2018 at 3:57 PM

Emily Chateau sings. Gary Beard plays.
  • Emily Chateau sings. Gary Beard plays.
Playhouse on the Square's New Works @The Works playwriting competition has resulted in some impressive debuts. The latest to see production is Crib, a 2016 winner opening at TheatreWork this weekend. Crib tells the story of Tracy, an African-American professor fighting for tenure, Rajon, a star athlete accused of plagiarism and threatened with expulsion, and of Coach Pari who reminds everybody that athletic money means more than academic honor.
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Crib sounds like a timely pick and is directed by Jaclyn Suffel, who helmed a previous winner, Victory Blues.


Does that sound a little heavy? Theatre Memphis goes light in the summer with musical revues and cabarets. This year's event, Ladies & Legends brings together Annie Freres, Lynden Lewis Jones, Emily Chateau, and Jacqueline Skoog. That's a lot of vocal dynamite. They'll perform pop hits, Broadway favorites, and movie classics. 
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Friday, June 29, 2018

A Short Chat With Dreamgirls' Breyannah Tillman

Posted By on Fri, Jun 29, 2018 at 4:23 PM

Breyannah Tillman
  • Breyannah Tillman
This past week Memphis represented at the National High School Musical Theatre Awards (AKA The Jimmys) when Riley Thad Young was named a finalist and scholarship winner. You can read all about that and catch his outstanding performance of "Memphis Lives in Me" right here. What my initial report failed to mention is the fact that this isn't the first time Memphis' next generation of performing artists has made a big splash at the Jimmys. Anybody interested in seeing a past finalist do what she does best, can check out Breyannah Tillman's performance as Effie in Playhouse on the Square's ongoing revival of Dreamgirls.


Tillman describes the HSMTA experience as being high pressure and way more cutthroat than the local version.

“I had just enough time to drop my bags and change into my workout clothes before I had to be in rehearsal,” she says recalling a process that only got more intense when she learned she’d finished third and would be performing a solo rendition of “Lot’s Wife/Salty Teardrops” from the musical drama Caroline or Change.

“The best part was I got to come up out of the floor,” Tillman says, describing her dramatic entrance on a lift. “And the Minskoff is full, and everybody bursts into applause.”

You can catch Tillman at Playhouse on the Square through July 15th.

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Young a Finalist for National High School Musical Awards

Posted By on Tue, Jun 26, 2018 at 2:33 PM

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Memphis lives on Broadway thanks to the National High School Music Awards (the Jimmy Awards) and recent Hernando High School grad Riley Thad Young.

Young made his Broadway debut this week at the Jimmys where he competed against students from around the country and performed a selection from Memphis the musical at New York City's Minskoff Theatre.

The soon-to-be college freshman was selected as outstanding lead performer at The Orpheum's 2018 High School Musical Theatre Awards. He was a $3,000-scholarship winner and one of eight finalists selected for a solo performance at this year's Jimmys.

Here's Young's interpretation of "Memphis Lives in Me."


If you'd like to learn more about the Jimmys, Playbill covered this year's awards. Also, if you want to know what the process is like, Young kept a journal for Broadway World

Friday, June 1, 2018

Halloran Centre Announces Supremely Cool 2018-19 On Stage Series

Posted By on Fri, Jun 1, 2018 at 12:37 PM

Kisses from Bettye LaVette
  • Kisses from Bettye LaVette

The Halloran Centre's diverse 2018-19 On Stage series includes the award-winning Fats Waller musical Ain't Misbehaving, a visit from classic soul artist Betty LaVette, a monthly jazz series curated by Kirk Whalum, Arthur Miller's evergreen drama, The Crucible, and those are just a few of the headliners.


In a field that runs the gamut from Great Balls of Fire curiosities like Dennis Quaid and the Sharks to soul royalty like original Supreme Mary Wilson, and chestnuts like an evening of Gilbert & Sullivan favorites, I'm probably most excited about LaVette, who starred in the Broadway hit Bubblin' Brown Sugar and whose early recordings showcase the talents of a group of Memphis artists that came to be known as The Dixie Flyers.

LaVette started recording in Detroit, 1962. She charted R&B hits with  "My Man — He's a Lovin' Man", "He Made a Woman Out of Me," and one of my favorite singles, "Let Me Down Easy." (Though, this studio performance is also fantastic).


"I'm not searching for anything," LaVette told The Flyer. In a 2011 interview, she described her long and winding career as a satisfying one. As soon as "My Man" hit she rolled out of Motor City on tour with headliner Ben E. King and an up-and-comer named Otis Redding. The Scene of the Crime, her collaboration with the Drive-By Truckers, had earned a Grammy nomination for best contemporary blues performance and introduced the veteran performer to a whole new generation of audiophiles.

"Old movies are my thing," LaVette said, beginning her life story with  "One scene that used to make [her] cry every time.

"You know the scene where somebody's flying somewhere and you see the plane in the sky and the names of the cities flash up on the screen? New York, Paris, and London. That's the scene that always made me cry, because my friends had been to all those places and I hadn't." That's all past tense now.

"So many people have asked me, 'What was it like to cut a record when you were only 16?' And I tell them that in 1962 in Detroit, that's just what you did. Everybody had a record or was cutting a record," LaVette said.

Fans were loyal, but fame was elusive. LaVette's thankful. "I met a better class of people," she says. "People who didn't want something from me."

Love her.

And now, here's the rest of the season...

ON STAGE AT THE HALLORAN CENTRE, 2018-2019

MUSIC

Saturday, August 18 Rodney Crowell

Friday, September 7 Rhonda Vincent and the Rage

Saturday, September 29 Dennis Quaid and the Sharks

Friday, October 12 Dougie MacLean

Saturday, October 20 Matt Stansberry & The Romance

Saturday, November 3 Bettye LaVette

Friday, November 30 Music of the Knights

2019

Saturday, January 26 Mary Wilson

Saturday, February 2 Jim Brickman, “Share the Love” Tour

Saturday, March 2 Dustbowl Revival

Saturday, March 16 Benise FUEGO! Spirit of Spain (two performances)

Saturday, April 13 Carlene Carter

Saturday, April 27 The Orbert Davis Jazz Ensemble



THEATRE SERIES

Saturday, November 17, 2018               
Ain’t Misbehavin’ (two performances)

Saturday, February 16, 2019                   
National Players in The Crucible (two performances)

Saturday, March 30, 2019                       
New York City Gilbert & Sullivan Players in the Wand’ring Minstrels, Pirates of Penzance, and an Evening of Gilbert & Sullivan Favorites



KAFÉ KIRK

Sunday, October 7, 2018 with Lindsey Webster
Sunday, December 2, 2018 with Jonathan Butler
Sunday, February 3, 2019 TBA
Sunday April 7, 2019 TBA



Friday, May 25, 2018

mömandpöp rock the Memphis Children's Theatre Festival

Posted By on Fri, May 25, 2018 at 3:19 PM

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I'm SO EXCITED!

mömandpöp is my favorite kid-rock comedy improv show ever and it's back in Memphis for a limited engagement at Voices of the South's 13th annual Memphis Children's Theatre Festival.

There's always a lot of good stuff to choose from at the MCTF but I can't get enough of these guys. The band's "Comeback Special" may be aimed at the small people in our lives, but the musical variety show transcends. Husband and wife duo Bobby and Virginia Matthews are terrific writers with a knack for improv and a gift for crafting infectious pop ditties so full of love and life they defy easy categorization

The gimmick goes something like this. Once upon a time...
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mömandpöp were rock stars. Like, LEGIT. But they abandoned all that to become plain old mom and pop. Now after many (many, many, many) years off the scene, they're pulling their musty British Invasion/folk revival-inspired act out act out of mothballs and retooling it for younger listeners. Think Schoolhouse Rock with a healthy dose of the Cowsills, and a solid pinch of The Monkees.


Pure joy. Check it all out. But check this out for sure.

Friday, May 4, 2018

Murder, Incest, More Murder and a Fun Home: Weekend Theater Roundup!

Posted By on Fri, May 4, 2018 at 2:07 PM

Stupid Fucking Bird - BILL SIMMERS
  • Bill Simmers
  • Stupid Fucking Bird
This is an abbreviated, "Your theater writer's just about to go on vacation," version of a regular roundup. The long and the short of the matter: It's a great weekend for theater fans in Memphis and here's why...

Theatre Memphis hosts the dysfunctional Weston family of August: Osage County (Review here)
August Osage County
  • August Osage County
Jitney, August Wilson's terrific portrait of the alternative economy is onstage at Hattiloo. (Review here)
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Shakespeare is well represented in Shelby Co. this weekend.

Iago torments Othello at TheatreWorks
New Moon's Othello
  • New Moon's Othello
And a Tempest blows into Germantown Community Theatre.
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Stupid Fucking Bird continues its run at The Circuit Playhouse


And a highly anticipated Tony-winning musical comes to Playhouse on the Square — Fun Home.

' If music festival's not your thing this is a great weekend to see what area theaters are serving up. Hard to go wrong. 

Friday, April 6, 2018

Dirty Dating, Homemade Opera, and God: A Weekend Theatre Roundup!

Posted By on Fri, Apr 6, 2018 at 1:23 PM

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If you find yourself in Germantown this weekend, First Date's not a terrible idea for an actual first date. And Saturday midnight performance at Germantown Community Theatre promises to be ... different.

This short, sweet rom-com musical introduces us to artsy, edgy Casey (Christina Hernandez)  and boring, businessy Aaron (Ryan Gilliam). They've been set up on a blind date and their meeting in a restaurant takes us through all the awkward stages from crushing one another's self esteem to Google background checks, to pre-planned bail-out calls, to wondering what to talk about next.

GCT's cast also showcases the talents of Nichol Pritchard, Jimmy Hoxie, Court Nixon, Jess Brookes, Jason Eschhofen, and Joe Johnson.

All I know about Saturday's special midnight show is that it's being described by cast and crew as "EXTRA raunchy," so bring your smelling salts.

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Daily Show writer Savid Javerbaum penned the comedy An Act of God, which gives the Supreme Being an opportunity to set the record straight on a variety of topics. Over the course of 90-minutes, the Good One discusses his famously mysterious ways, addresses longstanding misconceptions, weighs in on Adam and Steve, and pretty much lets it all hang out. Theatre Memphis' NextStage production is directed by Cecelia Wingate and stars Kevar Maffitt as God with Jason Gerhard and Stuart Turner as the angels Gabriel and Michael.
Bluff City Tri-Art Theatre Company is showcasing original works focusing on Memphis and the impact of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. BCTC Remembers reunites the 2-woman African-American comedy team Royston & O’Gray who wrote and toured together for more than a decade.
Friends of George's presents Dragnificent 2018: Dragnificent Doo-wop with music from the ‘50s and ‘60s, original skits, production numbers, and group performances featuring the ensemble cast.
Dye & Shoup
  • Dye & Shoup

The Opera 901 Showcase is about as Memphis as you can get without somebody grilling ribs on stage. The lineup of short works includes "Formidable," which tells the story of a woman scattering her father's ashes in the Mississippi River and hip-hop artist Marco Pave's dystopian "Grc Lnd," about a future outbreak of Yellow Fever and a rising tide of activism. "A Pretty Little Room" is technically set in Bolivar at the Western State Hospital for the Insane, while "Going Up" — originally created by Opera Memphis as part of its Ghosts of Crosstown project — tells the story of an elevator operator working for Sears. "Kayfabe" is subtitled "A Wrasslin' Opera," and unites librettist Jerre Dye with composer, arranger, and old-school rocker Sam Shoup to tell the story of a pretty boy grappler called Face coming to grips with his personal demons — and the big bad heel.

"This isn't about an actual Memphis wrestler. It's not about Jackie Fargo or Jimmy Hart," says Shoup, a veteran of MTV's weird video vanguard band the Dog Police and staff arranger for the National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center, New York Pops, and Memphis Symphony Orchestra. "But it is set in the Mid-South Coliseum in the 1970s. And let me tell you, it ain't Mozart.

"I played in a lot of '70s rock bands," Shoup says, describing the opera's attitude and sonic texture. "This show is 15 minutes of pure fun."

Speaking of fun, here's a little project Shoup did with Kallen Esperian — "The Immigrant Song."



Monday, March 26, 2018

Voices of the South Announces Fringe Festival Lineup

Posted By on Mon, Mar 26, 2018 at 2:22 PM

Berry & Madden
  • Berry & Madden
There are all kinds of fringe festivals big and small. A local fringe festival like the one Voices of the South is producing this spring, is an opportunity to sample a whole season's worth of independent performance in only a weekend or two.

Fun fact: Voices was born 22 years ago when Jenny Madden and Alice Berry were developing Southern narrative theater to take to the International Fringe Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland. This year Berry, Madden and the rest of the company will bring a taste of Edinburgh to their hometown with The Memphis FRINGE Festival, a two weekend event highlighting a diverse slate of area actors, movers, writers, and storytellers working just outside the mainstream.   

Here's The Memphis FRINGE Festival lineup.

The Laramie Project with Central High School

Fri., April 13 @ 7pm; Sat., April 14 @ 6pm; Sun., April 15 @ 5:30pm

In October 1998 Matthew Shepard was kidnapped, tied to a fence, beaten, and left to die alone on the outskirts of Laramie, Wyoming. Five weeks after this attack, members of the Tectonic Theatre Group traveled to Laramie to conduct interviews with the residents. They used these conversations to draft The Laramie Project, a narrative portrayal of life in Laramie the year after the murder. Sadly, many of the issues raised by Shepard’s brutal murder have not gone away in the twenty years since. Central High School’s theatre program is pleased to present an abridged version of this powerful play.



Stories in the Water with Latrelle Bright

Fri., April 13 @ 8pm; Sat., April 14 @ 7:30pm; Sun., April 15 @ 2:30pm

Stories in the Water explores deeply rooted relationships black people have with our most precious resource. From the shore of the vast ocean to the “community” swimming pool, a woman leads an expedition through the memory water holds. Leaving the safety of solid ground, water engulfs her, carries her across space time and delivers her home again.



The Feeling is Mutual with Sarah Ledbetter

Fri., April 13 @ 9pm; Sat., April 14 @ 9pm; Sun., April 15 @ 1:30pm

THE FEELING IS MUTUAL is a one woman show that creator Sarah Ledbetter really, really hopes you’ll like. It’s about gravity and other pesky inevitables. It involves dancing, talking, and thinking. It is somewhat challenging for the audience member in that it makes some pretty wild connections between different things, and is not always a display of virtuosity. It is, rather, a display of daring and sometimes mistaken efforts for the purpose of sharing with you, the audience, what it feels like to be dancing in front of a group of people who deserve to see something really beautiful happen.



Melanie with Myesha Williams

Sat., April 14 @ 11am; Sun., April 15 @ 4:30pm; Sat., April 21 @ 11am

Melanie tells a story of a strong lady who visits home after being adopted as a child. While reuniting with her grandmother, Melanie rediscovers a book filled with stories of her past grandmothers’ lives, reminisce unwanted feelings that she had as a child before adoption, and seek understanding for her upbringing. Melanie learns the expanded definition of unconditional love as she forgives her family and connect back with her roots.



Squaring Up: Project 1

Sat., April 14 @ Noon; Sun. April 15 @ 3:30pm; Sat. April 21 @ 1:30pm

Project 1 and Thistle & Bee hope to act as catalysts leading to a community that is aware of the human sex trafficking issue, and ready to take action to support services that help victims recover from the trauma. At the end of each performance, audience members are invited take part in an immersive artistic co-creation experience and a talk-back to process the performance and discuss how community members can work to help end sex trafficking in Memphis. Net ticket proceeds will be gifted to Thistle & Bee and the Lisieux Community.



The Cabin by Adam Remsen

Sat., April 14 @ 1:15pm, Sat., April 21 @ 3pm; Sun., April 22 @ 7:15pm

Quark presents The Cabin, an original play by Adam Remsen. Hilarity erupts as a brother and sister learn the dark secrets of their deceased mother's troubled past. Laugh yourself silly as two siblings delve deep into their family's unsettling history. This heart-wrenching family drama will leave you in stitches! A harrowing laugh riot!



The Sound of Cracking Bones with Jason Gerhard

Sat., April 14 @ 2:30pm, Sun., April 15 @ 7:30pm; Sat., April 21 @ Noon



The Healing Power of JC with Sara Kaye Larson

Sat., April 14 @ 3:45pm; Sun., April 15 @ 6:30pm; Sun., April 22 @ 4pm



The Curator with The Perry Library of Theatre

Sat., April 14 @ 5pm; Sat., April 21 @ 8:15pm; Sun., April 22 @ 5pm

THE PERRY LIBRARY OF THEATRE presents an original play by E. Warren Perry, Jr., The Curator. This one-act play grapples with the results of applying postmodernism and historical revisionism to a museum’s collection, to its logical and uproarious extreme. Set in a fictional southern museum, curator Dr. Ronald Saulsbury fights new museum influences and his axe-wielding young assistant to try to prevent the annihilation of every real artifact in the collection – and history itself.



Far Away by Caryl Churchill; Directed by James Kevin Cochran

Sun., April 15 @ 8:30pm; Sat., April 21 @ 7pm; Sun., April 22 @ 6pm

Joan wakes up in the middle of the night and sees something she’s not meant to see. She’s convinced to keep a secret that will forever alter the course of her life. Caryl Churchill’s brief and chilling Far Away paints a not so-far-away future where fear of “the other” rules supreme, and beauty, politics and violence strike an uneasy kinship. Confronting our deepest fears, Far Awaydepicts a chilling world where everyone and everything is at war, and not even the birds in the trees or the river below can be trusted. Whose side is the right side?



Sinners on a Southbound Bus with Danica Horton

Fri., April 20 @ 7pm; Sat., April 21 @ 5:30pm; Sun., April 22 @ 2pm

An evening bus ride from Montgomery to Dothan, Alabama; two men on the run– but was their action a sin or a virtue? This dark one-act explores power, morality, fear, and the ghosts we leave behind.

Please note: Strong language and violence. Not suitable for children.



Rebound with Jill Guyton Nee

Fri., April 20 @ 8pm; Sat., April 21 @ 4pm; Sun., April 22 @ 3pm


Friday, March 9, 2018

Theatre Memphis, Playhouse on the Square Announce 2018-19 Seasons

Posted By on Fri, Mar 9, 2018 at 3:10 PM

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Theatre Memphis and Playhouse on the Square have announced their 2018-2019 seasons. Local theater lovers can look forward to a number of regional and world premieres in addition a handful of popular favorites and certifiable classics.

With Louisa May Alcott adaptations coming to both POTS and Theatre Memphis we can expect a lot of Little Women on Stage.

THEATRE MEMPHIS' LOHREY STAGE

Ragged newspaper boys take on the newspaper industry in a nostalgic reminder of how we used to think organized labor was awesome...
•Disney’s Newsies August 24 – September 16, 2018

The shape-shifting, blood-sucking aristocrat hunter becomes the hunted...
•Dracula October 12 – 28, 2018

The original nightmare before Christmas...
•A Christmas Carol, November 30 – December 23, 2018

A beloved story about childhood, race, justice and its double in the American South —
•To Kill a Mockingbird, January 18 – February 3, 2019

The founding fathers sing about the weather (it's hot), death (it's sad), and an economic system built on molasses, rum, and slaves...
•1776, March 8 – 31, 2019
If a jerky celebrity has an accident at your party, maybe they should convalesce elsewhere. Think Stephen King's Misery in reverse — but funny-ish...  Add glamor.
•The Man Who Came to Dinner, April 26 – May 12, 2019

John Waters' 16-magazine-inspired valentine to big hair, cool R&B, and an ultimate, kid-led triumph over white assholes.
•Hairspray, June 7 – 30, 2019

NEXT STAGE at Theatre Memphis

The classic tale of an a not quite elderly British butcher meeting a no longer young waitress, receptionist, assassin etc. Uncertainty happens...
•Heisenberg — September 21 – October 7, 2018

A perennial favorite about teenage awkwardness and spelling...
•The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, November 2 – 17, 2018
Size matters? A new adaptation of the Louisa May Alcott classic...
•Little Women, February 8 – 24, 2019

Sarah Ruhl's Pulitzer finalist about a brazillain housecleaner who'd rather be doing standup comedy...
•The Clean House, April 5 – 20, 2019
Meanwhile, at...

PLAYHOUSE ON THE SQUARE

Gentlemen fall in love and become homicidal in the highly theatrical...
•A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder — August 10th – September 2, 2018
Speaking of love and murder, how about an epic mystery that begins when a boy finds his dog has become the victim of murder most foul?
•The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time — September 21 – October 7, 2018

The story of a little boy who won't grow up...
•Peter Pan — November 16th – December 30th, 2018

Until she does, of course.
•For Peter Pan on her 70th Birthday — November 30th – December 22, 2018

Life, love, and silliness go on and on and on in...
•Tuck Everlasting — January 18th – February 9th, 2019


But the line “Your wedding is my funeral” comes from another show called...
Significant OtherMarch 1st – March 24th, 2019

And as long as we're talking about life old chum, whether it be everlasting and bittersweet or short, brutish and cruel, it's only a...
•Cabaret — May 3rd – May 26th, 2019

Also, kids have superpowers and we'd all do well to remember that.
•Matilda — June 21st – July 14th, 2019

THE CIRCUIT PLAYHOUSE

Wolves, Wall Street and making money off...
Junk August 24th – September 9th, 2018

"Something something something," mumbled Jo lying on the floor...
•Little Women: The Broadway Musical — October 5th – October 28th, 2018

Much like Richard Nixon (and the current White House resident)...
•Junie B. Jones is Not a Crook — November 23rd – December 23rd, 2018

Lynn Nottage takes on deindustrialization in the Pulitzer Prize winning drama...
•Sweat — January 25th – February 17th , 2019

I can't even with...
•Madagascar: A Musical Adventure — March 15th – April 7th, 2019
Big Brother's watching. Listening. Mining your data. Etc. Shame we don't adapt Brave New World as often as we adapt...
•1984 — April 19th – May 12th, 2019

Elvis + Drag = Dang, what took you so long?
•The Legend of Georgia McBride — June 7th – June 30th, 2018

POTS@THEWORKS

•Back When Mike Was Kate —January 4th – January 27th, 2019

World Premiere

•The Miraculous and the Mundane  — July 12th – July 28, 2019

World Premiere
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