Friday, May 29, 2020

Memphis Record Stores Keep The Flame Of Vinyl Burning

Posted By on Fri, May 29, 2020 at 3:35 PM

On the racks at Audiomania
  • On the racks at Audiomania
In addition to being a boiling cauldron of musical creation, well documented in this week's cover story, Memphis is a city of world-class record stores. Both Goner Records and Shangri-La Records have been celebrated, by Rolling Stone and others, as being among the best in the country — or in the world. And there are others in their ranks as well, as reported thoroughly last year by Cady Jones in the Choose901 blog.

To cap off this week's celebration of all things musical in the Bluff City, I reached out to some of the finest purveyors of vinyl here, hoping to hear some good news about their continued survival.

But the first person I contacted offered a more sobering message. Paul Williams ran Audiomania for 30 years before shuttering it for good, a month ago. In an email exchange, Paul reflected on his years in the business and that rare magic to be found on certain corners in the city.

Memphis Flyer: What are your thoughts on closing down Audiomania? It meant a lot to many music fans, and not just in Memphis.

Paul Williams: First of all, Alex, I’m glad you’re the one writing this, since you were my first customer, back in 1990, when I opened up on Poplar. You came in with Alex Chilton. I think you told me a while back that you still have that Wreckless Eric album. Sometimes it doesn’t seem so long ago.

I would have kept going if it hadn’t been for the extraordinary situation that we find ourselves in. Audiomania had survived fire and flood, but I draw the line at pestilence. It seemed like the right time to get out of the tourist business, and it feels good to lose all the overhead expenses.

I got married a couple of years ago, and we’d been talking about it for a while, even before all this. Thirty years is a long time to do anything. Business was okay, but not great, and having a brick-and-mortar business can be a real ball and chain. I started working in record shops when Frank Berretta hired me at Poplar Tunes in 1982, so that’s a long time to be in retail.

I’ve been decompressing the last few weeks, chillin’ with the wife and Furry, our kitty, fixing things around the house, doing things I’ve been meaning to get around to for 30 years. There are things I’ll miss. I made some wonderful friendships, and met people from all over the world. I enjoyed regaling the tourists with local lore. There’s an old adage that if you stay at 2nd and Beale long enough, you’ll meet everyone you’ll ever need to meet. Madison and Belvedere was like that for me. I always loved hanging out in record stores, way before I ever owned one. I met my wife at Poplar Tunes back in the ’80s! Record stores can be magical places.
Paul Williams at Audiomania - PAT RAINER
  • Pat Rainer
  • Paul Williams at Audiomania

After connecting with Paul, I picked the brain of Eric Friedl, co-owner of Goner Records, to see how they're coping with this time of physical distancing. And he had more positive news, sorely needed in these times.

Memphis Flyer: I've read online that Goner has really pivoted to mail order these days.

Eric Friedl: Yeah, out of necessity. And surprisingly, to me, we have been doing a lot of local pick ups, that have been through people shopping on the website but picking it up. And I guess these people were customers that would come in and buy it in the store, rather than online customers before. So I think local customers have kinda transitioned to doing it that way too, for the time being. And that's been a big chunk of the business. We're used to sending records to people all over the world, but Memphis has been a really big part of that now. Local mail order!

Obviously we don't know everybody's back story when they're ordering, but people have been spending money, buying records. When all this started coming down, we had no idea what everybody would do. Even if you had a job, you might clam up and hold on tight. But people are using their money to support things they like. I look at it as kind of a charitable kind of thing. Like, "We want this to stick around, I'm gonna spend my money," Rather than, "I'll hole myself up and when I come out of this thing, I'll be okay, and nothing else will exist." I don't know that for sure. We've definitely gotten lots of support from people. Words of support, people saying they'll help any way they can, and I think we've seen that. But the orders have been surprisingly good. And maybe it's just that people are home, they're looking to stay entertained, and keep up with things and buy records, and have record parties at their house during the quarantine.

It's also a way for musicians without gigs to share this music: records! This way of sharing that's been around for over 100 years.

Yeah, it's been so atomized these days. Basically, you listen to one song in a playlist, then it's on to the next thing. That's how radio always worked, but not in your personal listening as much, I think. But yeah, it's a great thing for bands to be able to connect with people and sell their stuff, and get a little more than your Spotify plays are gonna get you, unless you're huge. It's such a small number. It's an intimate way to share your music. The numbers are so low now, you're pressing up 300 - 500 records just to see how they're gonna do, but still, you get money out of that.

Speaking of that, what is happening with record production in general, since the big fire destroyed the Apollo Masters facility this February?

That was a lacquer supply place. And all this, the coronavirus was coming down, that fire happened, and a whole lot of things got thrown into disarray at the same time. The people that use lacquers are the mastering places that master to a lacquer, then send it to be plated, and then they get pressed up. And our mastering people said they were fine for a few months with their supply. And everything kinda went on hiatus during the coronavirus, just because people didn't know how sales were gonna go. I don't know if the shortage is real, or if the shortage is just on hold, and once everybody starts cranking up, we're gonna find it harder to do. It's really not clear now. I think we're better off than it sounded like when that fire happened, but it's definitely a big deal. There's a couple other things happening. There's only a few places that do plating in the United States, and at least one of 'em, Mastercraft in New Jersey, is run by a guy who is getting up there in age and can't do it forever. And it's the kinda thing where one piece like that goes out and it can change the whole industry. So it'll be interesting to see.

How does the lacquer fit into the whole manufacturing process?

You send the recordings to the mastering place, and they cut the audio files into the lacquer. Then you send the lacquer to the plating facility, and they make the metal stamper off of that mastered acetate. And then you use those plates to stamp out all the records. All these processes are really 20th Century technology. They're dirty. When that acetate place went up, they said, "Well, if there's a need, someone will do it again." But you have to find a place that is able to do that and is set up kinda in the industrial space. It's not green in any way.

We'll see. Right now, everything is rolling. We've got four records that we're working on, and it looks like they'll come out in the fall, into next year. We delayed them a little bit, but not too bad. And everything is rolling. Tours are not happening to support the things. This Quintron record had a tour behind it that doesn't look like it's gonna happen as planned, but I think the demand's still gonna be there, especially as things hopefully get better towards the end of the year.

And new product is still arriving, right?

Yeah. People have stuck to their release schedules, despite everything. They've split the Record Store Day that was supposed to be in April into three different smaller days. [August 29th, September 26th, and October 24th]. And they're still trying to figure out what that means. There's a bunch of stuff that was supposed to come out earlier in the year, that's gonna be coming out at different drop times later this year.

We've been lucky. We've been able to take advantage of some of the assistance that's been offered. And we're still out there, scrounging for more help, trying to make it work. So far, so good. 
Eric Friedl and Zac Ives of Goner Records - MICHAEL DONAHUE
  • MIchael Donahue
  • Eric Friedl and Zac Ives of Goner Records

Finally, I reached out to Jared McStay, who co-owns Shangri-La Records. And his perspective got me thinking: Maybe, just maybe, there can be room for record stores in the new abnormal that life will inevitably become.

Memphis Flyer: How is Shangri-La dealing with this shelter-in-place era? Any plans on reopening?

Jared McStay: John [Miller] and I are having a big meeting about this today. We're trying to figure out exactly how we're gonna reopen. What is it gonna look like? We talk about it all the time, but we're really trying to figure out actual policies that we're gonna do.

For now, we do car service and we do online. Still doing mail order. We're buying records from people, via appointment. And when we reopen, it may just be by appointment. I'm sure we're gonna demand that everybody wear masks, and maybe gloves. We're gonna have some kind of sneeze guard station up by the register, so whoever is running the counter will feel safe. We're planning on reopening at some point, but I couldn't tell you what day it'll be.

Right now, during the week there's someone here from noon to five. So we have lots of people who look at our discogs.com page or our website and they'll just shop that way, and we bring it out to their car. And we do a lot of hand deliveries, mostly around Midtown. But really anybody who lives close enough that we can drive to, we'll just hand deliver it. And then a lot of mail order out of town. We're trying!

I don't even know exactly what Phase 2 is. I imagine if we do reopen, we may do it in concert with Goner. I wouldn't really want to reopen before they did. We've talked to them a little bit, but not anything definite. Obviously, they can do whatever they want. I don't want to open and force them to reopen, and vice versa. Honestly, ever since the city loosened stuff up, I've kinda wanted to wait at least a couple weeks, to see if Memphis became a hot spot again. But at some point, we're just gonna have to bite the bullet, if everybody else is opening. It's just that we don't want to contribute to anyone getting sick or feeling unsafe. At some point, everyone's gonna have to reopen, but it just doesn't feel right yet. But we can't go on forever as we are right now. And I don't know if I'd want to. People want to shop at a record store. You can only do so much of this. Eventually, people want to come in and look at a record store.

One way or another, we're gonna muddle through!
Jared McStay, co-owner of Shangri-La Records - J.D. REAGER
  • J.D. Reager
  • Jared McStay, co-owner of Shangri-La Records

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Thursday, May 28, 2020

The Flow: Live-Streamed Music Events This Week, May 28-June 3

Posted By on Thu, May 28, 2020 at 11:50 AM

Uriah Mitchell
  • Uriah Mitchell
Heading into June, the summer is upon us! Kudos to local performers who continue to pursue the live-stream option rather than throw physical distancing completely out the window. Beyond online streaming, see this week's cover story on the many other creative approaches musicians are taking in this era of quarantine.

REMINDER: The Memphis Flyer supports social distancing in these uncertain times. Please live-stream responsibly. We remind all players that even a small gathering could recklessly spread the coronavirus and endanger others. If you must gather as a band, please keep all players six feet apart, preferably outside, and remind viewers to do the same.

ALL TIMES CDT



Thursday, May 28
noon
Amy LaVere & Will Sexton
Facebook

1 p.m.
Vincent Cross - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

7 p.m.
DJs Lernard and Bernard Chambers - Benefit for Bridges, USA
Facebook

7 p.m.
The Rusty Pieces
Facebook


Friday, May 29
noon
Max Kaplan - Virtual Fridays in HSP
Facebook

1 p.m.
Xanthe Alexis - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

4 p.m.
Alice Hasen - Fiddlers Friday (every Friday)
Facebook

7 p.m.
Larry Springfield and The Suga Daddies - The SugaShack
Facebook

7 p.m.
Louise Page - Virtual Zebra Lounge
Facebook

8:30 p.m.
The Juke Joint AllStars & The Sensation Band
Wild Bill's Stay Safe At Home Live Stream
Facebook


Saturday, May 30
10:30 a.m.
Tony Manard - Coffee in a Cadillac
Facebook

1:30 p.m.
Michael Graber - Microdose (every Saturday)
Facebook

7 p.m.
Hologram Music Festival
Mylon Webb
Tree Riehl
DJ Ben Murray
DudeCalledRob
Ryan The Mind

Facebook

7:30 p.m.
Paul Taylor - Orpheum Theatre's Memphis Songwriters Series: Virtual Voices
Facebook

8 p.m.
Lil Al, G Reub and Uriah Mitchell - Live at Royal Studios with Boo Mitchell
Facebook

8:30 p.m.
The Juke Joint AllStars & The Sensation Band
Wild Bill's Stay Safe At Home Live Stream
Facebook


Sunday, May 31
4 p.m.
Bill Shipper - For Kids (every Sunday)
Facebook

5:30 p.m.
Organist Patrick A. Scott with Kelly Herrmann, flute - Grace St. Lukes Episcopal Church
Facebook

9 p.m.
Max Kaplan Band
Facebook

10:00 p.m.
Defcon Engaged (every Sunday)
Twitch TV


Monday, June 1
8 p.m.
John Paul Keith (every Monday)
Facebook


Tuesday, June 2
7 p.m.
Bill Shipper (every Tuesday)
Facebook

8 p.m.
Mario Monterosso (every Tuesday)
Facebook


Wednesday, June 3
7 p.m.
Miz Stefani (every Wednesday)
Facebook

8 p.m.
Richard Wilson (every Wednesday)
Facebook

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Tuesday, May 26, 2020

Local Luminaries Lend Talent To New Push For COVID-19 Relief

Posted By on Tue, May 26, 2020 at 12:44 PM

Susan Marshall
  • Susan Marshall
When the age of quarantine began, we wrote about the many initiatives to raise money for musicians caught over a barrel with the collapse of paying gigs and other work. One such relief effort, the Recording Academy's MusiCares COVID-19 Relief Fund, raised upwards of $15 million. But the need was so great, those funds have now been completely depleted.

So several members of the organization banded together to spread the word and raise more funds, by way of a tribute to the recently departed John Prine. Prine, a 2020 Recording Academy Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, who died April 7 from complications from COVID-19. A group of musicians and elected officials from Recording Academy chapters, including Christine Albert, Helen Bruner, Brandon Bush, John Driskell Hopkins, Tracy Hamlin, Tammy Hurt, Eric Jarvis, Terry Jones, Lee Levin, and Memphians Susan Marshall, and Jeff Powell, came together virtually while in quarantine to record a new version of Prine's "Angel from Montgomery."


As Tammy Hurt, vice chair of the Recording Academy board of trustees, and a drummer in the Atlanta chapter, observed in a statement: “John was a much-beloved country and folk singer/songwriter, with a very giving spirit. This project is a tribute to honor that spirit and, in turn, raise awareness for the work that MusiCares is doing to support music creators around the country affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Jeff Powell - JD REAGER
  • JD Reager
  • Jeff Powell
Susan Marshall, a singer well-known in the local scene, contributed the lead vocals and played the Wurlitzer keyboard. Her husband, Jeff Powell, served as the project's recording engineer.

Meanwhile, a salute to the singer/songwriter, Picture Show: A Tribute Celebrating John Prine, will be held online on June 11th at 7:30 pm. EDT. The performers have not yet been announced, but plans include family and friends sharing memories and Prine songs. The salute will be used to raise money for The National Alliance on Mental Health and Alive, a Middle Tennessee-based hospice and grief center.

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Thursday, May 21, 2020

The Flow: Live-Streamed Music Events This Week, May 21-27

Posted By on Thu, May 21, 2020 at 9:08 AM

Aquarian Blood
  • Aquarian Blood
The floodgates have been thrown open, and music will be inundating the internet this Memorial Day Weekend, including some impressive festivals. Check them out, and remember to donate to the players and their causes!

REMINDER: The Memphis Flyer supports social distancing in these uncertain times. Please live-stream responsibly. We remind all players that even a small gathering could recklessly spread the coronavirus and endanger others. If you must gather as a band, please keep all players six feet apart, preferably outside, and remind viewers to do the same.

ALL TIMES CDT

Thursday, May 21
Noon
Amy LaVere & Will Sexton with Art Edmaiston
Facebook

1 p.m.
Jonathan Plevyak - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

7 p.m.
DJ MemVille - Bridges, USA
Facebook

7 p.m.
The Rusty Pieces
Facebook

8 p.m.
Ihcilon & Acef Stripe - Verses Records
Facebook


Friday, May 22
Noon
Louise Page - Virtual Fridays in HSP
Facebook

1 p.m.
Johnny Dango - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

7 p.m.
Jen Norman - Mississippi Ale House
Facebook

7 p.m.
Justin Jaggers - benefit for The Baddour Center
Facebook

7 p.m.
Louise Page - Virtual Zebra Lounge
Facebook

8 pm
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band at Graceland
Facebook

8 p.m.
‘Stars of The Million Dollar Quartet’ (Rockabilly legends tribute), The Fab (Beatles tribute) and Dean Z (Elvis tribute artist) - Rockabilly to the Rescue!
Facebook

8:30 p.m.
The Juke Joint AllStars & The Sensation Band
Wild Bill's Stay Safe At Home Live Stream
Facebook


Saturday, May 23
10:30 a.m.
Tony Manard - Coffee in a Cadillac
Facebook

1:30 p.m.
Michael Graber
Facebook

3 p.m.
Devan Yanik, Rice Drewry, Abby Frances - Writers in the Round
Facebook

3 p.m.
Virtual Oxford Blues Festival
with
Reba Russell
R. L. Boyce
Ben Payton
Cassie Bonner
Lightnin Malcolm
Duwayne Burnside
Ghalia Volt
Cameron Kimbrough
Anthony "Big A" Sherrod
Matt Gaylord

Facebook

7 p.m.
John Nemeth & Matthew Wilson
Facebook

7:30 p.m.
Kelley Mickwee - Orpheum Theatre's Memphis Songwriters Series: Virtual Voices
Facebook

8:30 p.m.
The Juke Joint AllStars & The Sensation Band
Wild Bill's Stay Safe At Home Live Stream
Facebook


Sunday, May 24
11 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Goner Records, Burger Records, and Slovenly Recordings
Memorial Day Meltdown
with
Goner DJ Brunch
Sur Duda
Seth Petterson
Matthew Smith
Will Sprott
Chai
The Lemons
Sam Coffey and The Iron Lungs
Sanlisdiro
Saba Lou
Bella & The Bizarre
Craig Brown Band
John Wesley Coleman
Bloodshot Bill
Paul Collins
Thomas Mudrick
White Mystery
Red Mass
Bobby Harlow
Cosmonauts
Elephant Stone
Choke Chains
Aquarian Blood
Blag Dahlia (the dwarves)
Violet Archaea
Pink Mexico
Optic Sink
Bipolar
Hash Redactor
Telekrimin
Slander Tongue
Gino Is A Goon
Human Eye
Bazooka
The Zeros
Personal and The Pizzas
The Losin Streaks
The Sueves
Thigh Master
Michael Beach
NoBunny
Jack Oblivian and The Sheiks
Model Zero

+ more TBA
Facebook

3 p.m.
Big Rick and the Troublemakers - Burly's Burgers & Brews Blues Bash
Facebook

4 p.m.
Gerald Stephens with tap dancer Marinne Bell
Facebook

5:30 p.m.
Organist Patrick A. Scott with Andrew Carroll, bassoon & Debbie Smith, organ 
Grace St. Lukes Episcopal Church
Facebook

10 p.m.
Defcon Engaged (every Sunday)
Twitch TV


Monday, May 25
1 p.m.
Steven Bruce - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

8 p.m.
John Paul Keith (every Monday)
Facebook


Tuesday, May 26
1 p.m.
Jack Barksdale - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

8 p.m.
Mario Monterosso (every Tuesday)
Facebook


Wednesday, May 27
1 p.m.
Lacey Williams - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

7 p.m.
Miz Stefani (every Wednesday)
Facebook

8 p.m.
Richard Wilson (every Wednesday)
Facebook

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Tuesday, May 19, 2020

The Nick Black Challenge

Posted By on Tue, May 19, 2020 at 5:30 PM

Nick Black is host of "Nick Black's 30 Day Twitch Sample Challenge."
  • Nick Black is host of "Nick Black's 30 Day Twitch Sample Challenge."

Nick Black is on a musical roll.

He’s writing a new song every day for the next 30 days on Nick Black’s 30 Day Twitch Sample Challenge. He live streams at noon or later on twitch.tv/nickblackmusic.

“I’m going to create a song a day and each song is going to use a sample that a friend of mine has submitted or a fan has submitted,” Black says. “Any original kind of piece they have. Whether it’s a drummer or a keyboardist or a singer. They send me 30 seconds of a sample and that is going to be the inspiration for the song.

“The way that I work in this kind of situation is it could end up becoming the centerpiece of the song. It also could end up having an effect on the song. I just kind of have to follow inspiration wherever it goes.”

The resulting song “could end up as anything. There’s going to be a lot of mixing, so it will lave a lot of hip-hop influence, a lot of R&B ‘cause that’s the music I love. And probably a lot of neo soul as well.”

Black takes sample submissions at his email address: nickblackmusic.com/twitchchallenge.

“The stream is going to be sponsored by a company I endorse, Cordial Cables, instrument cables and recording cables.”

His first show aired May 18th with Black wearing a “Memphis Soul” shirt. He already was well stocked with samples before that first show. “I have got samples from my band and I’ve got samples from other musicians I’ve reached out to. I’m covered for a while, but there are people I would like to work with. So, if I do get samples from them, that would be great.”

He wants “lots of samples from Memphis musicians,” says Black, who counts Graham Winchester and John Paul Keith as among those he’d like to hear from. “Anybody that wants to submit from Memphis, I would love it.”

This isn’t an idea Black just came up with. “I’ve never had the time to do this. This is something I’ve wanted to do for a really long time.”

The quarantine was responsible for Black coming up with the show. “I think, honestly, the thing that I miss the most because of the quarantine is the collaboration between me and my band. This is sort of a glimpse inside what I would normally be doing. This is the quarantine version of all that.”

Black has released three albums and “a slew of singles” since his first album, The Soul Diaries, in 2012.  He explores mixing electronic music with acoustic elements in his recently-released single, “IRL.” 

He was touring nationally with sold-out shows, including Springboard West Music Festival in San Diego, The Mint in Los Angeles, and B-Side in Hollywood. But touring came to a halt with the pandemic. “We were forced off the road. We were up in New York supposedly to play at Berkeley College School of Music. They closed Berkeley a couple of days before our show. We were stranded and kind of had to make our way back home. 

“For the past two months I’ve been teaching a little bit here and there. I was at the University of Memphis heading the music business program over there.”

Black and his wife, Lena, also are hosting a weekly cooking show, “Cooking and Crooning.” “We go live on Facebook from my Facebook page. My wife will cook a vegetarian meal while I sing. In between the songs we’ll banter back and forth.”

Nick Black’s 30 Day Twitch Sample Challenge is a cooking show of sorts, Black says. “The sample could end up being the centerpiece at this kind of meal I’m cooking up, if you will. But it could also end up being a side."

To watch the show, click here: https://twitch.com/nickblackmusic


twitch_screenshot.png

Thursday, May 14, 2020

The Flow: Live-Streamed Music Events This Week, May 14-20

Posted By on Thu, May 14, 2020 at 11:38 AM

Juke Joint All Stars
  • Juke Joint All Stars
More live-streamed musical experiences are flowing through Memphis this week! Be it rock, folk, electronic, classical, jazz, or simply beyond category, the music needs to come out. Lend your ears and your eyes, and your coin, as often as you can.

REMINDER: The Memphis Flyer supports social distancing in these uncertain times. Please live-stream responsibly. We remind all players that even a small gathering could recklessly spread the coronavirus and endanger others. If you must gather as a band, please keep all players six feet apart, preferably outside, and remind viewers to do the same.

ALL TIMES CDT


Thursday, May 14th
2 p.m.
Amy LaVere & Will Sexton
Facebook

1 p.m.
Jeff Hulett - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

7 p.m.
Linda Gail Lewis
Facebook

7 p.m.
DJ Bizzle Bluebland
Facebook

7 p.m.
Rusty Pieces
Facebook

8 p.m.
Oakwalker
Facebook


Friday, May 15th
Noon
Jeff Hulett - Virtual Fridays in HSP
Facebook

6 p.m.
Mark Fredson - Acme Radio Live
Facebook

7 p.m.
Louise Page - "Virtual Zebra Lounge"
Facebook

8:30 p.m.
The Juke Joint AllStars & The Sensation Band
Wild Bill's Stay Safe At Home Live Stream
Facebook


Saturday, May 16th

10:30 a.m.
Tony Manard - Coffee in a Cadillac
Facebook

7:30 p.m.
Aaron James - Orpheum Theatre's Memphis Songwriters Series: Virtual Voices
Facebook

8:30 p.m.
The Juke Joint AllStars & The Sensation Band
Wild Bill's Stay Safe At Home Live Stream
Facebook

9 p.m.
Gerald Stephens - "Live Organ Plus" (every Saturday)
Facebook


Sunday, May 17th
3 p.m.
Dale Watson - Chicken $#!+ Bingo
Facebook

5:30 p.m.
Organist Patrick A. Scott and Debbie Smith with Benjamin Minden-Birkenmaier, guitar
Facebook

7:30 p.m.
Super Brick - Some proceeds go to the Dorothy Day House
Facebook

10 p.m.
Defcon Engaged (every Sunday)
Twitch TV


Monday, May 18th
6 p.m.
Edan Archer & Faith Evans Ruch - Acme Radio Live
Facebook

8 p.m.
John Paul Keith
Facebook


Tuesday, May 19th
8 p.m.
Mario Monterosso (every Tuesday)
Facebook


Wednesday, May 20th
6 p.m.
Sammy Kay - Acme Radio Live
Facebook

7 p.m.
Miz Stefani (every Wednesday)
Facebook

8 p.m.
Richard Wilson (every Wednesday)
Facebook

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Tuesday, May 12, 2020

Little Richard & Otis Redding: The Unsung Bond of Their Macon Roots

Posted By on Tue, May 12, 2020 at 10:26 AM

Little Richard & Otis Redding - (L) COURTESY SPECIALTY ARCHIVES; (R) BY JEAN PIERRE LELOIR
  • (l) courtesy Specialty Archives; (r) by Jean Pierre Leloir
  • Little Richard & Otis Redding
"When I heard Otis sing 'Lucille,' I thought it was me!" That's just one bombshell that dropped from the mouth of Little Richard many years ago, as he inducted Otis Redding into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1989. Some such inductions transcend sheer pageantry, and, though there was pageantry in all he did, Little Richard's tribute to the Big O was one of them.

It's worth revisiting that moment, now that the rock and roll firebrand, the "architect of rock 'n' roll," the Georgia Peach himself, has left us. Since Richard Penniman's death on Saturday at age 87, few could have missed the outpouring of both grief and love by a world celebrating his influence on modern music, from the Beatles to Prince. But fewer have noted the supreme influence of the Georgia Peach on another transcendent talent, usually associated with Memphis and Stax Records: Otis Redding.

That it was a deep and abiding influence is clear within the first seconds of Little Richard's appearance at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. As the band revs up the classic Stax arrangement of "I Can't Turn You Loose," he steps up to the podium and starts to sing. And it's eerie how much of Otis Redding's unique timbre and delivery is captured by his elder and inspiration, Little Richard, almost fifty years after Redding's own death. In that instant, you can hear the Richard in the Redding and the Redding in the Richard.


As he dips into other hits from Redding's repertoire, Little Richard's evocation of Redding's voice becomes more uncanny. Though the groove and feel of the Stax hits were very different from Little Richard's, and Otis never directly copied Richard's trademark "Wooooo!" (as the young Paul McCartney did), there is a deep resonance common to the delivery of both performers. And suddenly you can sense how powerful it must have been to be young and Black in 1950s Macon, Georgia, hearing and seeing a hometown hero ascend to immortality.
Little Richard - COURTESY SPECIALTY ARCHIVES
  • Courtesy Specialty Archives
  • Little Richard

"I can remember when Otis quit school he went out on the road with Little Richard's old band, the Upsetters," remembers his brother Rodgers Redding in Peter Guralnick's Sweet Soul Music. "And he would send home $25 a week. That was a lot of money in those days...I remember Otis saying, 'One of these days I'm going to be like them.' He was just determined, there was nothing that could have stopped him."


Indeed, it was when singing Little Richard's "Heebie Jeebies" that the young Otis Redding tasted success for the first time. "That song really inspired me to start singing," Otis told writer Stanley Booth. "I won the talent show for 15 straight nights with that song, and then they wouldn't let me sing no more, wouldn't let me win that five dollars any more." 

Before long, Otis Redding was singing in guitarist Johnny Jenkins' group, the Pinetoppers. When they had a regional hit with "Love Twist," Joe Galkin of Atlantic Records took notice, and sent them to Memphis to cut some more sides in the Stax Records studio. Galkin, claimed a third of all of Otis Redding's publishing royalties from that point on, and in return insisted that Stax's Jim Stewart record Redding as well as the Pinetoppers that day. He sang "These Arms of Mine" with the Stax house band, and the rest is history.


Viewing Little Richard's presentation from 1989, it's clear that he watched Otis' ascension with wonder and delight (and perhaps some envy?). As he sings one Otis hit after another, his internalization of the man's phrasing is remarkable. It's telling that, before that moment, Little Richard had not indulged in such music for decades. But when it was for Otis, he fired up the engines once more.

After the first number at the podium, Little Richard steps back to say, "I haven't done that in 30 years! Ooh my God, I felt good doing that. You all gonna make me scream like a white lady!"

More songs follow. Richard doesn't know all the words to "The Happy Song (Dum Dum)," but continues with fervor, undaunted, before noting, "Otis Redding was born in Macon, Georgia. His father was a preacher, and Otis Redding was a preacher," seeming to know that we won't take his words literally, knowing that we know Otis was a preacher in the church of soul.

When Richard invites Redding's wife, Zelma, up, the affection and protectiveness he feels for her is palpable. He won't let her speak until he takes her across the stage and exhorts photographers to "mash your button!" All in all, Little Richard's moment is less an induction ceremony than a warm embrace of all that Otis Redding meant to us, seemingly repaying the favor of Redding picking up where Richard left off, so many years ago.
Otis Redding at his ranch near Macon, GA - COURTESY STAX MUSEUM OF AMERICAN SOUL MUSIC
  • Courtesy Stax Museum of American Soul Music
  • Otis Redding at his ranch near Macon, GA

Want to explore Otis Redding's music? Start with his first album,
Pain In My Heart, released in 1964 on ATCO Records, featuring his version of Lucille as the closing track.

To hear more Little Richard, there's no better place to start than his debut album from 1957, Here's Little Richard, recently remastered and reissued by Craft Recordings, complete with a second disc of studio outtakes and demos Richard recorded at home in Macon in 1955.

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Friday, May 8, 2020

Levitt Shell’s Orion Concert Series, Shell Streams

Posted By on Fri, May 8, 2020 at 6:00 AM

Levitt Shell - JESSE DAVIS
  • Jesse Davis
  • Levitt Shell


The forecast this weekend calls for clear skies and moderate temperatures. If this were any other year, thousands of Memphians would probably be daydreaming about nights on the lawn at the Levitt Shell in Overton Park. But COVID-19 means that Levitt Shell executive director Natalie Wilson was forced to make some tough decisions.


“The Levitt Shell is on pause indefinitely,” Wilson says. “We hope to play on the stage again when it’s safe for all, but we’re going to take a proactive approach to opening.”


levitt_shell_picture2.jpeg

“We’re an open-air amphitheater. There are many ways to come into the venue, and social distancing at the Shell would be very difficult,” Wilson says. “If we put a fence around the Shell and say, ‘Okay, the first 500 get in and no more,’ well, that’s not meeting our mission of inclusivity, of open space, common ground, the diverse audience that we inspire.”


Wilson knows how important it is to keep the music going, but the health and safety of the community, performers, her staff, and volunteers has to be the first priority. “Right now, we’re focusing on the people first.”

To combat the quarantine blues, Wilson says, “We created the Orion Virtual Concert Series, which launched in April. We’re launching some of the greatest hits from our past, and we showcase them on Facebook Live.” The Levitt Shell has footage of more than 500 full-length concerts performed in that historic Midtown amphitheater, and they are broadcasting the archival footage Friday nights. The performances will stream at 7:30 p.m. Central, to coincide with the start time for the Shell’s live shows in the past. 


Levitt Shell Executive Director Natalie Wilson
  • Levitt Shell Executive Director Natalie Wilson

“When we put this out, we were thinking about our local community,” Wilson explains, but she adds, “We’re seeing people from all over the world joining us.” And why not? Already in May, the Orion Virtual Concert Series has shown a 2019 Delhi 2 Dublin concert, and this week’s show will feature genre-spanning pianist Charlie Wood. May’s shows will culminate with a 2016 concert by Memphis indie band Snowglobe on Friday, May 29th. (It was excellent. I was there.)


And as spring rolls into summer, in addition to the Friday-night archival shows, Wilson and her colleagues at the Shell will introduce live-streamed content on Saturdays. “We’re excited that on June 5th we’re going to be launching a second day of programming, which will be full-length live broadcast concerts. We’re calling them Shell Streams.”


“It’s a place that inspires community,” Wilson says of the Levitt Shell, which means her responsibility to the health and welfare of Memphis is doubly important. That’s why Wilson is committed to a data-driven plan to reopen the Shell — once there’s no question that it will be a safe and inviting environment for all music lovers.


Until then, she says, she just hopes that Memphians remember one thing. “We love our community,” Wilson says. “And we will be back.”


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Thursday, May 7, 2020

The Flow: Live-Streamed Music Events This Week, May 7-13

Posted By on Thu, May 7, 2020 at 1:35 PM

Louise Page
  • Louise Page
This city's online music game is strong! Memphis musicians continue to make our lives a little more harmonious — try to support as many as you can.

REMINDER: The Memphis Flyer supports social distancing in these uncertain times. Please live-stream responsibly. We remind all players that even a small gathering could recklessly spread the coronavirus and endanger others. If you must gather as a band, please keep all players six feet apart, preferably outside, and remind viewers to do the same.

ALL TIMES CDT

Thursday, May 7
2 p.m.
Amy LaVere & Will Sexton with Shawn and Krista
Facebook

1 p.m.
David Berkeley - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

5 p.m.
Devil Train - Live at B-Side
Facebook

6:30 p.m.
Steve Selvidge
Facebook

7 p.m.
Rusty Pieces
Facebook


Friday, May 8
Noon
DJ Chandler Blingg - Virtual Fridays in HSP
Facebook

2 p.m.
Jeremy Stanfill - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

6 p.m.
The Ellie Badge
Facebook

7 p.m.
Louise Page - "Virtual Zebra Lounge"
Facebook


Saturday, May 9

10:30 a.m.
Tony Manard - Coffee in a Cadillac
Facebook

1:30 p.m.
Michael Graber - Microdose
Facebook

6:30 p.m.
The Moody McStays, the Tunrstyles and So Gung Ho
Facebook


7:30 p.m.
The Prvlg - Orpheum Theatre's Memphis Songwriters Series: Virtual Voices
Facebook

8 p.m.
Chris Hamlett
Facebook

9 p.m.
Gerald Stephens - "Live Organ Plus" (every Saturday)
Facebook

Sunday, May 10
10 p.m.
Defcon Engaged (every Sunday)
Twitch TV


Monday, May 11
1 p.m.
Moonlight Social - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

8 p.m.
John Paul Keith
Facebook


Tuesday, May 12
8 p.m.
Mario Monterosso (every Tuesday)
Facebook


Wednesday, May 13
7 p.m.
Miz Stefani (every Wednesday)
Facebook

8 p.m.
Richard Wilson (every Wednesday)
Facebook

8 p.m.
Paul Taylor/New Memphis Colorways
Facebook

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Monday, May 4, 2020

Big BMA 2020 Winners Resonate With Memphis History

Posted By on Mon, May 4, 2020 at 12:15 PM

Mavis Staples - MYRIAM SANTOS
  • Myriam Santos
  • Mavis Staples
Time seemed to stand still as the 2020 Blues Music Awards unfolded on our screens yesterday: Nominees' home-recorded performances captured on cell phones, and comments from prominent members of the music world, mixed with unique flashbacks from prior years’ awards shows, featuring luminaries such as Dr. John, Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown, Koko Taylor, Honeyboy Edwards, Luther Allison, Rufus Thomas, Ruth Brown, and B. B. King.

It was an all-online gala, with Shemekia Copeland hosting from her home. The live-streamed event was archived and can still be seen on Facebook and YouTube.

Yet the connection with history went beyond archival footage. Some of this year's winners were seasoned veterans, embodying the living tradition of the blues more surely than any film footage. None other than Mavis Staples, so associated with the gospel and soul she cut at Stax Records and elsewhere, cemented her place in the blues with a win for Best Vocalist. And Bobby Rush took home the award for Best Soul Blues Album, a useful bookend to his 2017 Grammy for Porcupine Meat.

Christone "Kingfish" Ingram
  • Christone "Kingfish" Ingram
But, as if to prove that the blues are constantly being reborn, the biggest wins were scored by relative newcomer Christone "Kingfish" Ingram, of Clarksdale, Mississippi, who won  five statues, three for his debut album, Kingfish, as Best Emerging Artist Album, Best Contemporary Blues Album, and Album of the Year, along with two performer awards as Best Contemporary Blues Male Artist and for Instrumentalist-Guitar. Nick Moss and his band featuring Dennis Gruenling were also big winners with three awards: Band of the Year; Traditional Blues Album, for Lucky Guy!; and Moss personally in the Song of the Year category for his composition “Lucky Guy.” Last year’s Soul Blues Male Artist award winner, Sugaray Rayford, claimed that prize again this year along with the B.B. King Entertainer of the Year award.
Shemekia Copeland hosted, and won for Best Contemporary Female Vocalist
  • Shemekia Copeland hosted, and won for Best Contemporary Female Vocalist
Below is a more complete list of the winners, who continue to prove the resilience and necessity of the blues in these trying times. Bravo to one and all for adapting to the demands of physical distancing to make this a unique online event.

B.B. King Entertainer of the Year
Sugaray Rayford

Album of the Year
Kingfish, Christone "Kingfish" Ingram

Band of the Year
The Nick Moss Band feat. Dennis Gruenling

Song of the Year
“Lucky Guy,” written by Nick Moss

Best Emerging Artist Album
Kingfish, Christone "Kingfish" Ingram

Acoustic Blues Album
This Guitar and Tonight, Bob Margolin

Acoustic Blues Artist
Doug MacLeod

Blues Rock Album
Masterpiece, Albert Castiglia

Blues Rock Artist
Eric Gales

Contemporary Blues Album
Kingfish, Christone "Kingfish" Ingram

Contemporary Blues Female Artist
Shemekia Copeland

Contemporary Blues Male Artist
Christone "Kingfish" Ingram

Historical Blues Album
Cadillac Baby's Bea & Baby Records - Definitive Collection, Earwig Music

Soul Blues Album
Sitting on Top of the Blues, Bobby Rush

Soul Blues Female Artist
Bettye LaVette

Soul Blues Male Artist
Sugaray Rayford

Traditional Blues Album
Lucky Guy!, The Nick Moss Band Featuring Dennis Gruenling

Traditional Blues Female Artist
Sue Foley

Traditional Blues Male Artist
Jimmie Vaughan

Instrumentalist Bass
Michael "Mudcat" Ward

Instrumentalist Drums
Cedric Burnside

Instrumentalist Guitar
Christone "Kingfish" Ingram

Instrumentalist Harmonica
Rick Estrin

Instrumentalist Horn
Vanessa Collier

Instrumentalist Piano
Victor Wainwright

Instrumentalist Vocals
Mavis Staples

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Friday, May 1, 2020

The Sweet Solace of Safe @ Home

Posted By on Fri, May 1, 2020 at 1:00 PM

Just about everyone is working from home these days — even musicians. Today marks the release of Safe @ Home, an album made by two musicians sheltering in place in separate locations. Multi-instrumentalists Jeff Hulett and Jacob Church recorded the songs — in pieces — from their respective Midtown homes, and all proceeds from the sale of the album will benefit Music Export Memphis (MEM) and their COVID-19 Fund for musicians.

JACOB EDWARDS
  • Jacob Edwards
“We made this album all in quarantine over the past six weeks,” Hulett says. He used GarageBand and his smartphone to record acoustic guitar, vocals, drums, and keyboard sounds. Hulett then sent his tracks to Church, who used Pro Tools to record electric guitar, bass, drums and percussion, vocals, and more. Church mixed and mastered the album — with the exception of “N. Belvedere,” which was recorded and mixed by Andrew McCalla.

a1768943337_10.jpg
“This was a great opportunity to get to know Jacob Church more and try something completely different,” Hulett says. “His musicianship is top notch. I’m more of a rough-around-the-edges-type musician, so that pairing worked quite nicely. I’ve known Jacob for several years peripherally as he’s mixed and mastered some solo stuff and Me & Leah stuff. Then in February we did an in the round at DKDC with Graham Winchester. Little did we know then we’d be releasing an album together on May 1st. Strange how things come together sometimes, I guess.”
SAMILIA COLAR
  • Samilia Colar
Safe @ Home is suffused with a longing that speaks to the loneliness of life under lockdown. It’s a loneliness cut with sweetness, though — these are songs about friendship and love. Their sweetness and the wonderfully lo-fi pop production call to mind youthful friendships and long summer days when hours stretched, thick as honeysuckle-scented August air. In some ways the album feels like being grounded on a summer day in middle school — it’s the frustration of FOMO mingled with the satisfying certainty that, when this is over, the reunions will be twice as sweet. “Watch Out,” the album closer, is a stand-out track on an album that, except for the immediacy of the emotional content of the songs, does not feel as though it were only six weeks in the making. 
AMANDA MCKNIGHT
  • Amanda McKnight
ANDREW COSTEN
  • Andrew Costen
Further underlining the themes of collaboration and togetherness in spite of separation, each track on the seven-song album has a corresponding piece of art by a Memphis-based or formerly Memphis-based visual artist. “I'm an extrovert by nature so I'm always eager to collaborate and be in community with people,” Hulett says. “The biggest honor for me on this album was bringing as many people together as possible. From artists, to musicians to graphic designers to videographers this thing — all done in isolation — has brought so many people together.”


Between them, Church and Hulett have played with a multitude of noteworthy Memphis bands (think Snowglobe, The Ammunition, Me & Leah, and more), and the Memphis connections show. There are shades of Snowglobe, Chris Bell, and, at least to this listener’s ears, Shannon McNally’s pitch-perfect cover of Jim Dickinson’s “The Outlaw” from The Wandering. In all, Safe @ Home is an album that embraces both the bittersweet sadness of separation and the comfort of connection. 


Jeff Hulett and Jacob Church’s Safe @ Home is available via Bandcamp. All proceeds benefit Music Export Memphis.

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Thursday, April 30, 2020

The Flow: Live-Streamed Music Events This Week, April 30-May 6

Posted By on Thu, Apr 30, 2020 at 12:03 PM

Will Sexton & Amy LaVere
  • Will Sexton & Amy LaVere
The online music Renaissance continues unabated! Memphis musicians just need to put their work out there — try to support as many as you can.

REMINDER: The Memphis Flyer supports social distancing in these uncertain times. Please live-stream responsibly. We remind all players that even a small gathering could recklessly spread the coronavirus and endanger others. If you must gather as a band, please keep all players six feet apart, preferably outside, and remind viewers to do the same.


ALL TIMES CDT

Thursday, April 30
noon
Amy LaVere & Will Sexton
Facebook

1 p.m.
Neon Moon - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

2 p.m.
Nick Dittmeier & the Sawdusters - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

7 p.m.
Adam Holton
Facebook

7 p.m.
Jesse James Davis
Facebook

8:30 p.m.
Z-Dougie
Facebook


Friday, May 1
noon
Bailey Bigger - Virtual Fridays in HSP
Facebook

6 p.m.
Alex Greene - Songs for May Day
Facebook

7 p.m.
Louise Page - Virtual Zebra Lounge
Facebook


Saturday, May 2
10:30 a.m.
Tony Manard - Coffee in a Cadillac
Facebook

1:30 p.m.
Michael Graber - Microdose
Facebook

7:30 p.m.
Jeremy Stanfill - Orpheum Theatre's Memphis Songwriters Series: Virtual Voices
Facebook

9 p.m.
Gerald Stephens - Live Organ Plus (every Saturday)
Facebook


Sunday, May 3
4 p.m.
41st Annual Blues Music Awards - live presentations & home-recorded performances
Facebook & YouTube

7:30 p.m.
Super Brick - A portion of tips goes to the Dorothy Day House
Facebook

10 p.m.
Defcon Engaged (every Sunday)
Twitch TV


Monday, May 4
1 p.m.
Robert Gay - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

8 p.m.
John Paul Keith
Facebook


Tuesday, May 5
1 p.m.
This Frontier Needs Heroes - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

8 p.m.
Mario Monterosso (every Tuesday)
Facebook


Wednesday, May 6
1 p.m.
Zach Aaron - The Nuncheon Sessions
Facebook

7 p.m.
Miz Stefani (every Wednesday)
Facebook

8 p.m.
Richard Wilson (every Wednesday)
Facebook

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Wednesday, April 29, 2020

Belvedere Chamber Music Festival Goes Digital This Year

Posted By on Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 4:10 PM

For several years, the Belvedere Chamber Music Festival has brought its celebration of contemporary music to Grace-St. Luke's Episcopal Church. Last year, it had six hour-long concerts over four days, and all were free, as is the festival's custom.

Performance at the Belvedere Chamber Music Festival. - LUNA NOVA MUSIC
  • Luna Nova Music
  • Performance at the Belvedere Chamber Music Festival.
This year, the 14th annual festival will be held June 17-20 in digital form. Four concerts will be performed on Facebook, YouTube, and Belvedere's website.

The regular musicians are mostly from Memphis but some are from out of town. The programming is typically 20th and 21st century music, although the festival always starts off with a single work by Johann Sebastian Bach.

The festival also has held an annual composition contest since 2007. The 2020 winners announced this month are Alice Hong of the University of Toronto (1st prize) for "l’oiseau qui entend l'appel du vide" and Daniel Cho of Rice University's Shepherd School of Music (2nd prize) for "Anticipation."

The festival is sponsored by Luna Nova Music, which will post details on its website. Future Luna Nova concerts are scheduled for October 18th at Sanctuary on the Square in Collierville, November 1st at All Saints Episcopal Church in Memphis, and December 7th at Grace-St. Luke's Episcopal Church. 

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Opera Memphis Keeps Singing; Live at the Garden Season Cancelled

Posted By on Tue, Apr 28, 2020 at 4:19 PM

Opera Memphis is continuing its aggressive programming on Facebook. During April, it's been offering a digital version of its 30 Days of Opera program with an Aria Jukebox, a teaser about a hedgehog hoping to revive his opera career, and local singer Philip Himebook singing multiple parts in, for example, what Opera Memphis is calling the social distance version of "O Mio Babbino Caro."
Philip Himebook and Amanda Quinn singing  "O Mio Babbino Caro" on Facebook for Opera Memphis.
  • Philip Himebook and Amanda Quinn singing "O Mio Babbino Caro" on Facebook for Opera Memphis.

General director Ned Canty says that on Wednesdays at 7 p.m., Opera Memphis will have a variety of live events on its Facebook page. This week's Opera for Animals program will be co-hosted by WKNO's Kacky Walton, and next week will feature what Canty says is "an all musical theater edition of our 'Opera Bingo.'"

He says he hopes to bring the Sing to Me program back soon, where a singer and accompanist travel to various neighborhoods to perform at an appropriate distance. And he is offering to celebrate birthdays of front-line workers by having a performer serenade them with "Happy Birthday." Email singtome@operamemphis.org with contact info.

To see Opera Memphis' programming, go here.

Meanwhile, the Memphis Botanic Garden's (MBG) Live at the Garden season has been cancelled. Sherry May, co-director of Live at the Garden, posted on MBG's website that the scheduled May 6 announcement of the summer's acts was also cancelled.

The organization had hoped to celebrate its 20th anniversary with the season but now is considering other ways to mark the milestone. Live at the Garden brings in about 25 percent of the MBG's annual budget. May called the cancellation "financially devastating."

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Beale Street Music Festival Adjusting Lineup for October Event

Posted By on Tue, Apr 28, 2020 at 12:01 PM

Beale Street Music Festival at Tom Lee Park - MIM- FACEBOOK
  • MIM- Facebook
  • Beale Street Music Festival at Tom Lee Park
Hopefully, by now you've heard: October is the new May. As the city began this shelter-in-place era, Memphis in May and the Beale Street Music Festival (BSMF) announced the postponement of the perennial gathering until this fall. For those who might feel torn between BSMF and the Mempho Music Festival, traditionally held in October also, never fear: the latter event has been postponed until sometime next year.

While many prognosticate that even October is too soon to anticipate a return to normalcy, BSMF planners are hoping for the best and getting their ducks in a row. Given the current volatility of the touring circuit, it's surprising that most of the acts scheduled for this spring have confirmed for the later date. The final lineup will be announced in June.

In a statement released last Friday, BSMF spokespeople wrote,

Eighty-five percent of the 60+ artists announced in early February will return except the following six artists due to scheduling conflicts in October: The Lumineers, The 1975, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Liam Gallagher, Louis the Child and Toad the Wet Sprocket. Festival fans who purchased tickets specifically to see these artists perform may obtain a full refund of their festival ticket purchase via Eventbrite through April 30, or they may hold their tickets for use on the fall dates.

Memphis in May is bigger than BSMF, of course, and other related events have been rescheduled as well:

World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest: September 30 – October 3, 2020
Beale Street Music Festival: October 16-18, 2020
Great American River Run: rescheduled for the fall, date TBA
International Salute to Ghana: May 1-31, 2021

The Memphis in May board acknowledges that the future is uncertain, and continues to monitor new developments. “While millions are currently impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, we are hopeful that by this fall the situation will have improved enough to allow us to present the 2020 Beale Street Music Festival in a safe environment and provide music fans cause for celebration,” said James L. Holt, President and CEO of Memphis in May. “Our fall 2020 lineup features many of music’s biggest names representing a broad spectrum of musical genres and we look forward to announcing additional artists and a killer lineup with our June announcement of the ‘Memphis in October’ Beale Street Music Festival.”

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