Friday, April 17, 2009

Are You Shakespearianced?: Bard-inspired plays abound this weekend.

Posted by on Fri, Apr 17, 2009 at 3:55 PM

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Mercifully, Playhouse on the Square's spunky but misguided production of Shakespeare's Romeo & Juliet closes this weekend, just as a variety of plays written or inspired by the Avon's bard open to the public. Here's how it all shakes out.

Alicia Queen, a recent standout in the Rhodes College theater department takes a stab at playing Kate the cursed in the McCoy Theatre's production of Taming of the Shrew. Meanwhile, on the other side of town, the University of Memphis opens The African Company Presents Richard III, a rambling but no less riveting story about America's first African-American theater troupe.

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead, playwright Tom Stoppard's witty, wordy, answer to Hamlet opens at Theatreworks, courtesy of the New Moon Theatre Company. Although R&G, the comedy that established Stoppard as a major dramatic author, borrows heavily from its source material it is utimately more like Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot than anything Shakespeare ever wrote.

Once you get past the Hamlet-inspired title, The Play's the Thing, opening at Germantown Community Theatre tonight (Friday, April 17), doesn't have much to do with Shakespeare. That doesn't mean Ferenc Molnar's farce (adapted by P.G. Wodehouse) isn't grand in its own fashion. When Albert, the play's leading man, overhears his actress fiance carrying on with another man his friends create an elaborate play to convince him she was merely rehearsing for her next role.

Check Flyer listings for dates and showtimes.

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