GroveReb84 
Member since Mar 21, 2012

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Re: “Mayor: Memphis Situation Different from New Orleans on Confederate Statues

I'm not sure how that's related Bric.

However, I'm pro corruption being brought forward with both parties. I don't trust either major party, and I think the two party system doesn't serve the people at all.

I also think that those who think their party is somehow significantly better and more honest than the other are just fools, the lot of you.

To give just some recent examples, the Dems basically guaranteed that the people would not have the opportunity to put Sanders on the ticket. On the flip side, despite the efforts of the GOP to deny Trump, the minute he got the nomination, the entire party lined up behind him, even though he's hardly a conservative, and even though most of them can't agree with him. All either party cares about is power and being able to pull the strings. The players involved are all just pawns for the big money to manipulate, yet few of us care to do anything about it. Instead, we buy this idea that even if we don't like our party's candidate, we have to line up behind him/her in order to keep that other one out of office.

6 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by GroveReb84 on 05/25/2017 at 12:54 PM

Re: “Mayor: Memphis Situation Different from New Orleans on Confederate Statues

@LandB,

I was going to actually respond, but then I kept reading and realized that you're so all over the place it'd be hard to address any of it.

I do find it interesting though that there is so much focus on the heritage and history of the Confederacy, when the Confederacy only lasted for 4 years. That's it. The CSA was the length of a college stay, unless you're a doctor, or just an Ole Miss grad like myself that makes sure to stretch to at least an extra semester or two.

One 4 year period in history drives ALL of this heritage argument. Why not pick 1931-1935 instead and focus on memorializing that period of our heritage? Why not pick 1984-1988? Or 1652-1656?

It's really odd when you think about it that way. We don't do the same for 1939-1945 for WWII? WWII gave us the Greatest Generation and really spurred the transition of the US into THE true world power. Why do we not spend as much effort and time concerning ourselves with that part of our heritage?

I think I know the answers to why that is, but it just makes it that much more obvious when you put it into that context.

5 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by GroveReb84 on 05/25/2017 at 8:23 AM

Re: “Mayor: Memphis Situation Different from New Orleans on Confederate Statues

@CL,

I think people giving the finger to Faulkner has more to do with them having a general disdain for run-on sentences.

2 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by GroveReb84 on 05/24/2017 at 3:42 PM

Re: “Mayor: Memphis Situation Different from New Orleans on Confederate Statues

Again, it all comes back to intent.

I bring up the Georgia state flag all the time. Changing it in the 1950s was done directly as a resistance to the Civil Rights movement. Therefore, you can't argue that the flag was honoring history, or that it was about heritage. That state flag was about hate, period, because of the intent at the time of its creation.

The same goes for statues. If they were really erected about honoring the dead, and they weren't a part of a movement to resist Reconstruction or the Civil Rights movement, then fine, keep them.

For example, the Confederate soldier statue on the Ole Miss campus is there to memorialize the students, all of whom left to fight in the war and died. It wasn't erected as a middle finger to the North.

On the flip side, the city of Oxford has a Confederate statue on the Square that was erected facing South, specifically because they wanted it to have its back facing the North, essentially turning its back on the North.

To me, that's a different ballgame and a different intent.

Some may disagree, but I do think the original intent matters, and with most Confederate memorials or symbols, the original intent of their use was often a resistance to black Americans gaining equal status in society.

7 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by GroveReb84 on 05/24/2017 at 9:59 AM

Re: “Mayor: Memphis Situation Different from New Orleans on Confederate Statues

@ncrdbl1,

That's why some of us are suggesting new monuments just be built around the Forest statue. Leave it alone. Let it stand. Just build some other monuments around it that just so happen to be tall enough and wide enough that it becomes really hard to see that it's there.

6 likes, 8 dislikes
Posted by GroveReb84 on 05/23/2017 at 2:30 PM

Re: “Mayor: Memphis Situation Different from New Orleans on Confederate Statues

@Funk,

I have to agree with you there.

Confederate symbols and monuments, in MOST cases were erected or displayed as part of a resistance to unifying the country, or in many cases a resistance to integration efforts.

As I argue with anything, intent is what really matters. The intent of many of these monuments was not to honor the dead, but to make sure that certain people knew their place and couldn't avoid being reminded of their place.

9 likes, 15 dislikes
Posted by GroveReb84 on 05/23/2017 at 2:29 PM

Re: “Mayor: Memphis Situation Different from New Orleans on Confederate Statues

@George Payne,

Would that really be an alteration?

The statue would still stand in its current form, completely undisturbed.

Nothing in the law says that the view to the statue must be unobstructed.

I think you could erect 4 separate slabs of marble or something of that nature on each side. Maybe one could honor Echol Cole, one for Robert Walker, and one for MLK, the first two being the sanitation workers that died prompting the sanitation strike that led to MLK's speech and assassination. The 4th could be for whoever else you wanted to honor related to the Civil Rights history in Memphis.

I don't see how that would be an alteration to the statue at all. I would love to see the city try it, if for nothing else, to force the state to have to go to court to fight against the erection of Civil Rights monuments.

If the state wants to have the law in place, make them a national story and an embarrassment.

15 likes, 39 dislikes
Posted by GroveReb84 on 05/23/2017 at 9:38 AM

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